Blog
About

467
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
0 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: found
      • Article: found
      Is Open Access

      Characterization of medical students recall of factual knowledge using learning objects and repeated testing in a novel e-learning system

      Read this article at

      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Abstract

          Background

          Spaced-repetition and test-enhanced learning are two methodologies that boost knowledge retention. ALERT STUDENT is a platform that allows creation and distribution of Learning Objects named flashcards, and provides insight into student judgments-of-learning through a metric called ‘recall accuracy‘. This study aims to understand how the spaced-repetition and test-enhanced learning features provided by the platform affect recall accuracy, and to characterize the effect that students, flashcards and repetitions exert on this measurement.

          Methods

          Three spaced laboratory sessions (s0, s1 and s2), were conducted with n=96 medical students. The intervention employed a study task, and a quiz task that consisted in mentally answering open-ended questions about each flashcard and grading recall accuracy. Students were randomized into study-quiz and quiz groups. On s0 both groups performed the quiz task. On s1 and s2, the study-quiz group performed the study task followed by the quiz task, whereas the quiz group only performed the quiz task. We measured differences in recall accuracy between groups/sessions, its variance components, and the G-coefficients for the flashcard component.

          Results

          At s0 there were no differences in recall accuracy between groups. The experiment group achieved a significant increase in recall accuracy that was superior to the quiz group in s1 and s2. In the study-quiz group, increases in recall accuracy were mainly due to the session, followed by flashcard factors and student factors. In the quiz group, increases in recall accuracy were mainly accounted by flashcard factors, followed by student and session factors. The flashcard G-coefficient indicated an agreement on recall accuracy of 91% in the quiz group, and of 47% in the study-quiz group.

          Conclusions

          Recall accuracy is an easily collectible measurement that increases the educational value of Learning Objects and open-ended questions. This metric seems to vary in a way consistent with knowledge retention, but further investigation is necessary to ascertain the nature of such relationship. Recall accuracy has educational implications to students and educators, and may contribute to deliver tailored learning experiences, assess the effectiveness of instruction, and facilitate research comparing blended-learning interventions.

          Electronic supplementary material

          The online version of this article (doi:10.1186/s12909-014-0275-0) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users.

          Related collections

          Most cited references 89

          • Record: found
          • Abstract: found
          • Article: not found

          The measurement of observer agreement for categorical data.

           G Koch,  J R Landis (1977)
          This paper presents a general statistical methodology for the analysis of multivariate categorical data arising from observer reliability studies. The procedure essentially involves the construction of functions of the observed proportions which are directed at the extent to which the observers agree among themselves and the construction of test statistics for hypotheses involving these functions. Tests for interobserver bias are presented in terms of first-order marginal homogeneity and measures of interobserver agreement are developed as generalized kappa-type statistics. These procedures are illustrated with a clinical diagnosis example from the epidemiological literature.
            Bookmark
            • Record: found
            • Abstract: not found
            • Article: not found

            The measurement of observer agreement for categorical data

              Bookmark
              • Record: found
              • Abstract: not found
              • Article: not found

              The measurement of observer agreement for categorical data

               JR Landis,  GG Koch (1977)
                Bookmark

                Author and article information

                Contributors
                tiago.taveira@me.com
                rcosta4540@gmail.com
                milton@med.up.pt
                mameliaferreira@med.up.pt
                Journal
                BMC Med Educ
                BMC Med Educ
                BMC Medical Education
                BioMed Central (London )
                1472-6920
                24 January 2015
                24 January 2015
                2015
                : 15
                Affiliations
                [ ]Department of Medical Education and Simulation, Faculty of Medicine of the University of Porto, Porto, Portugal
                [ ]ALERT Life Sciences Computing, Vila Nova de Gaia, Portugal
                [ ]Abel Salazar Biomedical Sciences Institute, University of Porto, Porto, Portugal
                275
                10.1186/s12909-014-0275-0
                4326410
                25616353
                © Taveira-Gomes et al.; licensee BioMed Central. 2015

                This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License ( http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly credited. The Creative Commons Public Domain Dedication waiver ( http://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/) applies to the data made available in this article, unless otherwise stated.

                Categories
                Research Article
                Custom metadata
                © The Author(s) 2015

                Comments

                Comment on this article