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      The ideal neighbourhood for ageing in place as perceived by frail and non-frail community-dwelling older people

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          ABSTRACT

          Due to demographic changes and a widely supported policy of ageing in place, the number of community-dwelling older people will increase immensely. Thus, supportive neighbourhoods enabling older people to age in place successfully are required. Using Q-methodology, we examined older people's perceptions of the comparative importance of neighbourhood characteristics for ageing in place. Based on the World Health Organization's Global Age-friendly Cities guide, we developed 26 statements about physical and social neighbourhood characteristics. Thirty-two older people in Rotterdam, half of whom were frail, rank-ordered these statements. Q-factor analysis revealed three distinct viewpoints each among frail and non-frail older people. Comparisons within and between groups are discussed. Although both frail and non-frail older people strongly desired a neighbourhood enabling them to age in place, they have divergent views on such a neighbourhood. Older people's dependence on the neighbourhood seems to be dynamic, affected by changing social and physical conditions and levels of frailty.

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          Social Isolation in America: Changes in Core Discussion Networks over Two Decades

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            Effects of Volunteering on the Well-Being of Older Adults

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              Multilevel modelling of built environment characteristics related to neighbourhood walking activity in older adults.

              To examine the relation between built environment factors (representing several dimensions of urban form of neighbourhoods) and walking activity at both the neighbourhood level and the resident level, in an older adult sample. A cross sectional, multilevel design with neighbourhoods as the primary sampling unit and senior residents as the secondary unit. Five hundred and seventy seven residents (mean age = 74 years, SD = 6.3 years) participated in the survey, which was conducted among 56 city defined neighbourhoods in Portland, Oregon, USA. Neighbourhood level variables were constructed using geographical information systems. Resident level variables consisted of a mix of self reports and geocoded data on the built environment. Self reported neighbourhood walking. A positive relation was found between built environment factors (density of places of employment, household density, green and open spaces for recreation, number of street intersections) and walking activity at the neighbourhood level. At the resident level, perceptions of safety for walking and number of nearby recreational facilities were positively related to high levels of walking activity. A significant interaction was observed between number of street intersections and perceptions of safety from traffic. Certain neighbourhood built environment characteristics related to urban form were positively associated with walking activity in the neighbourhoods of senior residents. Public health promotion of walking activity/urban mobility and the design of interventions need to consider the contribution of neighbourhood level built environment influences.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Ageing and Society
                Ageing and Society
                Cambridge University Press (CUP)
                0144-686X
                1469-1779
                September 2015
                July 03 2014
                September 2015
                : 35
                : 8
                : 1771-1795
                Article
                10.1017/S0144686X14000622
                1b7e7a0b-c4f5-4e9d-97eb-d90c3fdcbc88
                © 2015

                https://www.cambridge.org/core/terms

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