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Biological synthesis of gold nanoparticles using Magnolia kobus and Diopyros kaki leaf extracts

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Process Biochemistry

Elsevier BV

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      Rapid synthesis of Au, Ag, and bimetallic Au core-Ag shell nanoparticles using Neem (Azadirachta indica) leaf broth.

      We report on the use of Neem (Azadirachta indica) leaf broth in the extracellular synthesis of pure metallic silver and gold nanoparticles and bimetallic Au/Ag nanoparticles. On treatment of aqueous solutions of silver nitrate and chloroauric acid with Neem leaf extract, the rapid formation of stable silver and gold nanoparticles at high concentrations is observed to occur. The silver and gold nanoparticles are polydisperse, with a large percentage of gold particles exhibiting an interesting flat, platelike morphology. Competitive reduction of Au3+ and Ag+ ions present simultaneously in solution during exposure to Neem leaf extract leads to the synthesis of bimetallic Au core-Ag shell nanoparticles in solution. Transmission electron microscopy revealed that the silver nanoparticles are adsorbed onto the gold nanoparticles, forming a core-shell structure. The rates of reduction of the metal ions by Neem leaf extract are much faster than those observed by us in our earlier studies using microorganisms such as fungi, highlighting the possibility that nanoparticle biological synthesis methodologies will achieve rates of synthesis comparable to those of chemical methods. Copyright 2004 Elsevier Inc.
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        Synthesis of gold nanotriangles and silver nanoparticles using Aloe vera plant extract.

        Biogenic gold nanotriangles and spherical silver nanoparticles were synthesized by a simple procedure using Aloe vera leaf extract as the reducing agent. This procedure offers control over the size of the gold nanotriangle and thereby a handle to tune their optical properties, particularly the position of the longitudinal surface plasmon resonance. The kinetics of gold nanotriangle formation was followed by UV-vis-NIR absorption spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The effect of reducing agent concentration in the reaction mixture on the yield and size of the gold nanotriangles was studied using transmission electron microscopy. Monitoring the formation of gold nanotriangles as a function of time using TEM reveals that multiply twinned particles (MTPs) play an important role in the formation of gold nanotriangles. It is observed that the slow rate of the reaction along with the shape directing effect of the constituents of the extract are responsible for the formation of single crystalline gold nanotriangles. Reduction of silver ions by Aloe vera extract however, led to the formation of spherical silver nanoparticles of 15.2 nm +/- 4.2 nm size.
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          Biological synthesis of triangular gold nanoprisms.

          The optoelectronic and physicochemical properties of nanoscale matter are a strong function of particle size. Nanoparticle shape also contributes significantly to modulating their electronic properties. Several shapes ranging from rods to wires to plates to teardrop structures may be obtained by chemical methods; triangular nanoparticles have been synthesized by using a seeded growth process. Here, we report the discovery that the extract from the lemongrass plant, when reacted with aqueous chloroaurate ions, yields a high percentage of thin, flat, single-crystalline gold nanotriangles. The nanotriangles seem to grow by a process involving rapid reduction, assembly and room-temperature sintering of 'liquid-like' spherical gold nanoparticles. The anisotropy in nanoparticle shape results in large near-infrared absorption by the particles, and highly anisotropic electron transport in films of the nanotriangles.
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            Author and article information

            Journal
            Process Biochemistry
            Process Biochemistry
            Elsevier BV
            13595113
            October 2009
            October 2009
            : 44
            : 10
            : 1133-1138
            10.1016/j.procbio.2009.06.005
            © 2009

            http://www.elsevier.com/tdm/userlicense/1.0/

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