Blog
About

1
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
0 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: found
      • Article: found
      Is Open Access

      ECRG2, a novel transcriptional target of p53, modulates cancer cell sensitivity to DNA damage

      , ,

      Cell Death & Disease

      Nature Publishing Group UK

      Tumour-suppressor proteins, Apoptosis

      Read this article at

      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Abstract

          Esophageal Cancer-Related Gene 2 (ECRG2) is a recently identified tumor suppressor, its regulation and involvement in DNA damage response are unknown. Here, we show that DNA damage-induced ECRG2 upregulation coincided with p53 activation and occurred in a p53-dependent manner. We identified two p53-binding sites within ECRG2 promoter and found the promoter activity, mRNA, and protein expression to be regulated by p53. We show that DNA damage significantly enhanced p53 binding to ECRG2 promoter at the anticipated p53-binding sites. We identified a novel natural ECRG2 promoter variant harboring a small deletion that exists in the genomes of ~38.5% of world population and showed this variant to be defective in responding to p53 and DNA-damage. ECRG2 overexpression induced cancer cell death; ECRG2 gene disruption enhanced cell survival following anticancer drug treatments even when p53 was induced. We showed that lower expression of ECRG2 in multiple human malignancies correlated with reduced disease-free survival in patients. Collectively, our novel findings indicate that ECRG2 is an important target of p53 during DNA damage-induced response and plays a critical role in influencing cancer cell sensitivity to DNA damage-inducing cancer therapeutics.

          Related collections

          Most cited references 47

          • Record: found
          • Abstract: found
          • Article: not found

          Oncomine 3.0: genes, pathways, and networks in a collection of 18,000 cancer gene expression profiles.

          DNA microarrays have been widely applied to cancer transcriptome analysis; however, the majority of such data are not easily accessible or comparable. Furthermore, several important analytic approaches have been applied to microarray analysis; however, their application is often limited. To overcome these limitations, we have developed Oncomine, a bioinformatics initiative aimed at collecting, standardizing, analyzing, and delivering cancer transcriptome data to the biomedical research community. Our analysis has identified the genes, pathways, and networks deregulated across 18,000 cancer gene expression microarrays, spanning the majority of cancer types and subtypes. Here, we provide an update on the initiative, describe the database and analysis modules, and highlight several notable observations. Results from this comprehensive analysis are available at http://www.oncomine.org.
            Bookmark
            • Record: found
            • Abstract: found
            • Article: not found

            Noxa, a BH3-only member of the Bcl-2 family and candidate mediator of p53-induced apoptosis.

            A critical function of tumor suppressor p53 is the induction of apoptosis in cells exposed to noxious stresses. We report a previously unidentified pro-apoptotic gene, Noxa. Expression of Noxa induction in primary mouse cells exposed to x-ray irradiation was dependent on p53. Noxa encodes a Bcl-2 homology 3 (BH3)-only member of the Bcl-2 family of proteins; this member contains the BH3 region but not other BH domains. When ectopically expressed, Noxa underwent BH3 motif-dependent localization to mitochondria and interacted with anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 family members, resulting in the activation of caspase-9. We also demonstrate that blocking the endogenous Noxa induction results in the suppression of apoptosis. Noxa may thus represent a mediator of p53-dependent apoptosis.
              Bookmark
              • Record: found
              • Abstract: found
              • Article: not found

              Tumor suppressor p53 is a direct transcriptional activator of the human bax gene.

              The bax gene promoter region contains four motifs with homology to consensus p53-binding sites. In cotransfection assays using p53-deficient tumor cell lines, wild-type but not mutant p53 expression plasmids transactivated a reporter gene plasmid that utilized the bax gene promoter to drive transcription of chloramphenicol acetyltransferase. In addition, wild-type p53 transactivated reporter gene constructs containing a heterologous minimal promoter and a 39-bp region from the bax gene promoter in which the p53-binding site consensus sequences reside. Introduction of mutations into the consensus p53-binding site sequences abolished p53 responsiveness of reporter gene plasmids. Wild-type but not mutant p53 protein bound to oligonucleotides corresponding to this region of the bax promoter, based on gel retardation assays. Taken together, the results suggest that bax is a p53 primary-response gene, presumably involved in a p53-regulated pathway for induction of apoptosis.
                Bookmark

                Author and article information

                Contributors
                huangy@upstate.edu
                Journal
                Cell Death Dis
                Cell Death Dis
                Cell Death & Disease
                Nature Publishing Group UK (London )
                2041-4889
                17 July 2020
                17 July 2020
                July 2020
                : 11
                : 7
                Affiliations
                GRID grid.411023.5, ISNI 0000 0000 9159 4457, Department of Pharmacology, , State University of New York Upstate Medical University, ; 750 East Adams Street, Syracuse, NY 13210 USA
                Article
                2728
                10.1038/s41419-020-2728-1
                7367829
                32681017
                © The Author(s) 2020

                Open Access This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article’s Creative Commons license, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If material is not included in the article’s Creative Commons license and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/.

                Funding
                Funded by: FundRef https://doi.org/10.13039/100002645, Carol M. Baldwin Breast Cancer Research Fund (Carol M. Baldwin Breast Cancer Research Fund, Inc.);
                Award ID: 0000
                Award Recipient :
                Categories
                Article
                Custom metadata
                © The Author(s) 2020

                Cell biology

                apoptosis, tumour-suppressor proteins

                Comments

                Comment on this article