6
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
0 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: found
      • Article: not found

      Collective synchrony increases prosociality towards non-performers and outgroup members.

      Read this article at

      ScienceOpenPublisherPubMed
      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Abstract

          Previous research has found that behavioural synchrony between people leads to greater prosocial tendencies towards co-performers. In this study, we investigated the scope of this prosocial effect: does it extend beyond the performance group to an extended ingroup (extended parochial prosociality) or even to other people in general (generalized prosociality)? Participants performed a simple rhythmic movement either in time (synchrony condition) or out of time (asynchrony condition) with each other. Before and during the rhythmic movement, participants were exposed to a prime that made salient an extended ingroup identity. After the task, half of the participants had the opportunity to help an extended ingroup member; the other half had the opportunity to help an outgroup member. We found a main effect of our synchrony manipulation across both help targets suggesting that the prosocial effects of synchrony extend to non-performers. Furthermore, there was a significantly higher proportion of participants willing to help an outgroup member after moving collectively in synchrony. This study shows that under certain intergroup contexts synchrony can lead to generalized prosociality with performers displaying greater prosociality even towards outgroup members.

          Related collections

          Author and article information

          Journal
          Br J Soc Psychol
          The British journal of social psychology
          Wiley-Blackwell
          2044-8309
          0144-6665
          Dec 2016
          : 55
          : 4
          Affiliations
          [1 ] National University of Singapore, Singapore.
          [2 ] Coventry University, UK.
          [3 ] Institute of Cognition and Culture, Queen's University, Belfast, UK.
          [4 ] Institute of Cognitive and Evolutionary Anthropology, University of Oxford, UK.
          Article
          10.1111/bjso.12165
          27683102
          1bee73a3-c396-4367-ab08-d6d02b35d0e2
          History

          cooperation,dance,helping,identity,prosocial,ritual,synchrony
          cooperation, dance, helping, identity, prosocial, ritual, synchrony

          Comments

          Comment on this article