Blog
About

171
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
0 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: found
      • Article: found
      Is Open Access

      MetaboAnalyst 3.0—making metabolomics more meaningful

      Read this article at

      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Abstract

          MetaboAnalyst ( www.metaboanalyst.ca) is a web server designed to permit comprehensive metabolomic data analysis, visualization and interpretation. It supports a wide range of complex statistical calculations and high quality graphical rendering functions that require significant computational resources. First introduced in 2009, MetaboAnalyst has experienced more than a 50X growth in user traffic (>50 000 jobs processed each month). In order to keep up with the rapidly increasing computational demands and a growing number of requests to support translational and systems biology applications, we performed a substantial rewrite and major feature upgrade of the server. The result is MetaboAnalyst 3.0. By completely re-implementing the MetaboAnalyst suite using the latest web framework technologies, we have been able substantially improve its performance, capacity and user interactivity. Three new modules have also been added including: (i) a module for biomarker analysis based on the calculation of receiver operating characteristic curves; (ii) a module for sample size estimation and power analysis for improved planning of metabolomics studies and (iii) a module to support integrative pathway analysis for both genes and metabolites. In addition, popular features found in existing modules have been significantly enhanced by upgrading the graphical output, expanding the compound libraries and by adding support for more diverse organisms.

          Related collections

          Most cited references 32

          • Record: found
          • Abstract: found
          • Article: found
          Is Open Access

          Data, information, knowledge and principle: back to metabolism in KEGG

          In the hierarchy of data, information and knowledge, computational methods play a major role in the initial processing of data to extract information, but they alone become less effective to compile knowledge from information. The Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) resource (http://www.kegg.jp/ or http://www.genome.jp/kegg/) has been developed as a reference knowledge base to assist this latter process. In particular, the KEGG pathway maps are widely used for biological interpretation of genome sequences and other high-throughput data. The link from genomes to pathways is made through the KEGG Orthology system, a collection of manually defined ortholog groups identified by K numbers. To better automate this interpretation process the KEGG modules defined by Boolean expressions of K numbers have been expanded and improved. Once genes in a genome are annotated with K numbers, the KEGG modules can be computationally evaluated revealing metabolic capacities and other phenotypic features. The reaction modules, which represent chemical units of reactions, have been used to analyze design principles of metabolic networks and also to improve the definition of K numbers and associated annotations. For translational bioinformatics, the KEGG MEDICUS resource has been developed by integrating drug labels (package inserts) used in society.
            Bookmark
            • Record: found
            • Abstract: found
            • Article: found
            Is Open Access

            HMDB 3.0—The Human Metabolome Database in 2013

            The Human Metabolome Database (HMDB) (www.hmdb.ca) is a resource dedicated to providing scientists with the most current and comprehensive coverage of the human metabolome. Since its first release in 2007, the HMDB has been used to facilitate research for nearly 1000 published studies in metabolomics, clinical biochemistry and systems biology. The most recent release of HMDB (version 3.0) has been significantly expanded and enhanced over the 2009 release (version 2.0). In particular, the number of annotated metabolite entries has grown from 6500 to more than 40 000 (a 600% increase). This enormous expansion is a result of the inclusion of both ‘detected’ metabolites (those with measured concentrations or experimental confirmation of their existence) and ‘expected’ metabolites (those for which biochemical pathways are known or human intake/exposure is frequent but the compound has yet to be detected in the body). The latest release also has greatly increased the number of metabolites with biofluid or tissue concentration data, the number of compounds with reference spectra and the number of data fields per entry. In addition to this expansion in data quantity, new database visualization tools and new data content have been added or enhanced. These include better spectral viewing tools, more powerful chemical substructure searches, an improved chemical taxonomy and better, more interactive pathway maps. This article describes these enhancements to the HMDB, which was previously featured in the 2009 NAR Database Issue. (Note to referees, HMDB 3.0 will go live on 18 September 2012.).
              Bookmark
              • Record: found
              • Abstract: found
              • Article: found
              Is Open Access

              MZmine 2: Modular framework for processing, visualizing, and analyzing mass spectrometry-based molecular profile data

              Background Mass spectrometry (MS) coupled with online separation methods is commonly applied for differential and quantitative profiling of biological samples in metabolomic as well as proteomic research. Such approaches are used for systems biology, functional genomics, and biomarker discovery, among others. An ongoing challenge of these molecular profiling approaches, however, is the development of better data processing methods. Here we introduce a new generation of a popular open-source data processing toolbox, MZmine 2. Results A key concept of the MZmine 2 software design is the strict separation of core functionality and data processing modules, with emphasis on easy usability and support for high-resolution spectra processing. Data processing modules take advantage of embedded visualization tools, allowing for immediate previews of parameter settings. Newly introduced functionality includes the identification of peaks using online databases, MSn data support, improved isotope pattern support, scatter plot visualization, and a new method for peak list alignment based on the random sample consensus (RANSAC) algorithm. The performance of the RANSAC alignment was evaluated using synthetic datasets as well as actual experimental data, and the results were compared to those obtained using other alignment algorithms. Conclusions MZmine 2 is freely available under a GNU GPL license and can be obtained from the project website at: http://mzmine.sourceforge.net/. The current version of MZmine 2 is suitable for processing large batches of data and has been applied to both targeted and non-targeted metabolomic analyses.
                Bookmark

                Author and article information

                Journal
                Nucleic Acids Res
                Nucleic Acids Res
                nar
                nar
                Nucleic Acids Research
                Oxford University Press
                0305-1048
                1362-4962
                01 July 2015
                20 April 2015
                20 April 2015
                : 43
                : Web Server issue
                : W251-W257
                Affiliations
                [1 ]Institute of Parasitology, and Department of Animal Science, McGill University, Ste. Ann de Bellevue, QC H9X 3V9, Canada
                [2 ]Department of Microbiology and Immunology, McGill University, Montreal, QC H3A 2B4, Canada
                [3 ]Department of Computing Science, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB T6G 2E8, Canada
                [4 ]Department of Biological Sciences, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB T6G 2E9, Canada
                [5 ]National Institute for Nanotechnology, 11421 Saskatchewan Drive, Edmonton, AB T6G 2M9, Canada
                Author notes
                [* ]To whom correspondence should be addressed. Tel: +1 514 398 8668; Fax: +1 514 398 7857; Email: jeff.xia@ 123456mcgill.ca
                Article
                10.1093/nar/gkv380
                4489235
                25897128
                © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

                This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License ( http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted reuse, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

                Counts
                Pages: 7
                Product
                Categories
                Web Server issue
                Custom metadata
                1 July 2015

                Genetics

                Comments

                Comment on this article