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      Interpersonal dependency and online gaming addiction

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          Abstract

          Background and aims

          The present study explores the relationship between social motivations and addiction to online gaming and if that possible connection can be explained by the personality traits responsible for social functioning.

          Methods

          We employ Bernstein’s concept of interpersonal dependency to distinguish healthy dependency, dysfunctional detachment, and destructive overdependence, and Charlton and Danforth’s conceptualisation of online gaming addiction and high engagement. An online questionnaire was administered to a self-nominated sample of 4,074 online gamers. Two regression models were constructed to separately explain gaming addiction and high engagement using social motivations to play, while controlling for age, gender, and time spent online.

          Results

          High scores on subscales measuring dysfunctional detachment and destructive overdependence were positively associated with online gaming addiction, while healthy dependency was negatively correlated with addiction scores. In contrast, the overall role of social motivation was negligible.

          Discussion

          People with healthy relationship profiles are less likely to develop problematic patterns of online gaming. High in-game engagement, although sharing some factors with addiction, was only poorly explained by the study variables, suggesting the mutual exclusiveness of addiction and engagement.

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          Most cited references 36

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          A cognitive-behavioral model of pathological Internet use

           R.A. Davis (2001)
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            Impulse and Self-Control From a Dual-Systems Perspective.

            Though human beings embody a unique ability for planned behavior, they also often act impulsively. This insight may be important for the study of self-control situations in which people are torn between their long-term goals to restrain behavior and their immediate impulses that promise hedonic fulfillment. In the present article, we outline a dual-systems perspective of impulse and self-control and suggest a framework for the prediction of self-control outcomes. This framework combines three elements that, considered jointly, may enable a more precise prediction of self-control outcomes than they do when studied in isolation: impulsive precursors of behavior, reflective precursors, and situational or dispositional boundary conditions. The theoretical and practical utility of such an approach is demonstrated by drawing on recent evidence from several domains of self-control such as eating, drinking, and sexual behavior.
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              Preference for Online Social Interaction: A Theory of Problematic Internet Use and Psychosocial Well-Being

               Scott Caplan (2003)
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                jba
                Journal of Behavioral Addictions
                J Behav Addict
                Akadémiai Kiadó (Budapest )
                2062-5871
                2063-5303
                March 2016
                12 December 2015
                : 5
                : 1
                : 108-114
                Affiliations
                Faculty of Social Studies, Masaryk University , Brno, Czech Republic
                Author notes
                [* ]Corresponding author: Kateřina Škařupová; Faculty of Social Studies, Masaryk University, Joštova 218/10, 602 00 Brno, Czech Republic; Phone: (+420) 549 49 3180; E-mail: skarupovakat@ 123456gmail.com
                Article
                10.1556/2006.5.2016.002
                5322987
                26690326
                © 2016 Akadémiai Kiadó, Budapest
                Page count
                Figures: 0, Tables: 3, Equations: 0, References: 42, Pages: 19
                Funding
                Funding sources: The authors acknowledge the support of the VITOVIN project (CZ.1.07/2.3.00/20.0184), which is co-financed by the European Social Fund and the state budget of Czech Republic, and the support of the Czech Science Foundation (GA15-19221S).
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