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      The role of phosphate in kidney disease

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          Fibroblast growth factor 23 is elevated before parathyroid hormone and phosphate in chronic kidney disease.

          Fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF23) regulates phosphorus metabolism and is a strong predictor of mortality in dialysis patients. FGF23 is thought to be an early biomarker of disordered phosphorus metabolism in the initial stages of chronic kidney disease (CKD). We measured FGF23 in baseline samples from 3879 patients in the Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort study, which is a diverse cohort of patients with CKD stage 2-4. Mean serum phosphate and median parathyroid hormone (PTH) levels were in the normal range, but median FGF23 was markedly greater than in healthy populations, and increased significantly with decreasing estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR). High levels of FGF23, defined as being above 100 RU/ml, were more common than secondary hyperparathyroidism and hyperphosphatemia in all strata of eGFR. The threshold of eGFR at which the slope of FGF23 increased was significantly higher than the corresponding threshold for PTH based on non-overlapping 95% confidence intervals. Thus, increased FGF23 is a common manifestation of CKD that develops earlier than increased phosphate or PTH. Hence, FGF23 measurements may be a sensitive early biomarker of disordered phosphorus metabolism in patients with CKD and normal serum phosphate levels.
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            Relation between serum phosphate level and cardiovascular event rate in people with coronary disease.

            Higher levels of serum phosphate are associated with adverse cardiovascular outcomes, especially in the setting of overt hyperphosphatemia. Given the biological importance of phosphorus, it is plausible that higher levels of serum phosphate within the normal range may also be associated with adverse outcomes. We performed a post hoc analysis of data from the Cholesterol And Recurrent Events (CARE) study. Baseline serum phosphate levels were measured in 4127 fasting participants who were randomized to receive pravastatin 40 mg daily or placebo and followed up for a median of 59.7 months. We used Cox proportional-hazards models to examine the association between serum phosphate and adverse clinical outcomes after adjustment for potential confounders. During nearly 60 months of follow-up, 375 participants died. A significant association was noted between baseline serum phosphate level and the age-, race-, and sex-adjusted risk of all-cause death (hazard ratio per 1 mg/dL, 1.27; 95% confidence interval, 1.02 to 1.58). After categorization based on baseline phosphate level ( or =4 mg/dL) and further adjustment, a graded independent relation between phosphate and death was observed (P for trend=0.03). For instance, participants with serum phosphate > or =3.5 mg/dL had an adjusted hazard ratio for death of 1.27 (95% confidence interval, 1.02 to 1.59) compared with those with serum phosphate of <3.5 mg/dL. Higher levels of serum phosphate were also associated with increased risk of new heart failure, myocardial infarction, and the composite of coronary death or nonfatal myocardial infarction, but not the risk of stroke. We found a graded independent relation between higher levels of serum phosphate and the risk of death and cardiovascular events in people with prior myocardial infarction, most of whom had serum phosphate levels within the normal range. Given the ready availability and low cost of serum phosphate assays, this finding may prove clinically useful.
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              Predictors and consequences of altered mineral metabolism: the Dialysis Outcomes and Practice Patterns Study.

              Altered mineral metabolism contributes to bone disease, cardiovascular disease, and other clinical problems in patients with end-stage renal disease. This study describes the recent status, significant predictors, and potential consequences of abnormal mineral metabolism in representative groups of hemodialysis facilities (N= 307) and patients (N= 17,236) participating in the Dialysis Outcomes and Practice Patterns Study (DOPPS) in the United States, Europe, and Japan from 1996 to 2001. Many patients fell out of the recommended guideline range for serum concentrations of phosphorus (8% of patients below lower target range, 52% of patients above upper target range), albumin-corrected calcium (9% below, 50% above), calcium-phosphorus product (44% above), and intact PTH (51% below, 27% above). All-cause mortality was significantly and independently associated with serum concentrations of phosphorus (RR 1.04 per 1 mg/dL, P= 0.0003), calcium (RR 1.10 per 1 mg/dL, P < 0.0001), calcium-phosphorus product (RR 1.02 per 5 mg(2)/dL(2), P= 0.0001), PTH (1.01 per 100 pg/dL, P= 0.04), and dialysate calcium (RR 1.13 per 1 mEq/L, P= 0.01). Cardiovascular mortality was significantly associated with the serum concentrations of phosphorus (RR 1.09, P < 0.0001), calcium (RR 1.14, P < 0.0001), calcium-phosphorus product (RR 1.05, P < 0.0001), and PTH (RR 1.02, P= 0.03). The adjusted rate of parathyroidectomy varied 4-fold across the DOPPS countries, and was significantly associated with baseline concentrations of phosphorus (RR 1.17, P < 0.0001), calcium (RR 1.58, P < 0.0001), calcium-phosphorus product (RR 1.11, P < 0.0001), PTH (RR 1.07, P < 0.0001), and dialysate calcium concentration (RR 0.57, P= 0.03). Overall, 52% of patients received some form of vitamin D therapy, with parenteral forms almost exclusively restricted to the United States. Vitamin D was potentially underused in up to 34% of patients with high PTH, and overused in up to 46% of patients with low PTH. Phosphorus binders (mostly calcium salts during the study period) were used by 81% of patients, with potential overuse in up to 77% patients with low serum phosphorus concentration, and potential underuse in up to 18% of patients with a high serum phosphorus concentration. This study expands our understanding of the relationship between altered mineral metabolism and outcomes and identifies several potential opportunities for improved practice in this area.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Nature Reviews Nephrology
                Nat Rev Nephrol
                Springer Nature
                1759-5061
                1759-507X
                January 2017
                November 21 2016
                : 13
                : 1
                : 27-38
                Affiliations
                [1 ]on behalf of the ERA–EDTA Working Group on Chronic Kidney Disease–Mineral and Bone Disorders and the European Renal Nutrition Working Group
                Article
                10.1038/nrneph.2016.164
                © 2016

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