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      Recovery characteristics of patients receiving either sugammadex or neostigmine and glycopyrrolate for reversal of neuromuscular block: a randomised controlled trial

      1 , 2 , 3 , 4

      Anaesthesia

      Wiley

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          Most cited references 15

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          Sugammadex compared with neostigmine/glycopyrrolate for routine reversal of neuromuscular block: a systematic review and economic evaluation.

          The cost-effectiveness of sugammadex for the routine reversal of muscle relaxation produced by rocuronium or vecuronium in UK practice is uncertain. We performed a systematic review of randomized controlled trials of sugammadex compared with neostigmine/glycopyrrolate and an economic assessment of sugammadex for the reversal of moderate or profound neuromuscular block (NMB) produced by rocuronium or vecuronium. The economic assessment aimed to establish the reduction in recovery time and the 'value of time saved' which would be necessary for sugammadex to be potentially cost-effective compared with existing practice. Three trials indicated that sugammadex 2 mg kg⁻¹ (4 mg kg⁻¹) produces more rapid recovery from moderate (profound) NMB than neostigmine/glycopyrrolate. The economic assessment indicated that if the reductions in recovery time associated with sugammadex in the trials are replicated in routine practice, sugammadex would be cost-effective if those reductions are achieved in the operating theatre (assumed value of staff time, £4.44 per minute), but not if they are achieved in the recovery room (assumed value of staff time, £0.33 per minute). However, there is considerable uncertainty in these results. Sugammadex has the potential to be cost-effective compared with neostigmine/glycopyrrolate for the reversal of rocuronium-induced moderate or profound NMB, provided that the time savings observed in trials can be achieved and put to productive use in clinical practice. Further research is required to evaluate the effects of sugammadex on patient safety, predictability of recovery from NMB, patient outcomes, and efficient use of resources.
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            Retrospective investigation of postoperative outcome after reversal of residual neuromuscular blockade: sugammadex, neostigmine or no reversal.

            Postoperative residual neuromuscular blockade (RNMB) is associated with significant morbidity.
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              A systematic review of sugammadex vs neostigmine for reversal of neuromuscular blockade.

              We reviewed systematically sugammadex vs neostigmine for reversing neuromuscular blockade. We included 17 randomised controlled trials with 1553 participants. Sugammadex reduced all signs of residual postoperative paralysis, relative risk (95% CI) 0.46 (0.29-0.71), p = 0.0004 and minor respiratory events, relative risk (95% CI) 0.51 (0.32-0.80), p = 0.0034. There was no difference in critical respiratory events, relative risk (95% CI) 0.13 (0.02-1.06), p = 0.06. Sugammadex reduced drug-related side-effects, relative risk (95% CI) 0.72 (0.54-0.95), p = 0.02. There was no difference in the rate of postoperative nausea or the rate of postoperative vomiting, relative risk (95% CI) 0.94 (0.79-1.13), p = 0.53, and 0.87 (0.65-1.17), p = 0.36 respectively.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Anaesthesia
                Anaesthesia
                Wiley
                00032409
                March 2018
                March 2018
                December 07 2017
                : 73
                : 3
                : 340-347
                Affiliations
                [1 ]Department of Anaesthesia and Pain Medicine; King Edward Memorial Hospital; Perth Australia
                [2 ]Department of Anaesthesia; Stoke Mandeville Hospital; Aylesbury UK
                [3 ]Department of Anaesthesia; Sir Charles Gairdner Hospital; Perth Australia
                [4 ]School of Women's and Infants’ Health; University of Western Australia; Perth Australia
                Article
                10.1111/anae.14174
                © 2017

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