13
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
0 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: found
      • Article: not found

      Genetic polyandry and sexual conflict in the sandbar shark, Carcharhinus plumbeus, in the western North Atlantic and Gulf of Mexico.

      Read this article at

      ScienceOpenPublisherPubMed
      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Abstract

          To investigate patterns of polyandry in the sandbar shark (Carcharhinus plumbeus), 20 pregnant females were sampled from the western North Atlantic and Gulf of Mexico. Five species-specific microsatellite markers were used to genotype each shark and its litter. Of 20 litters, 17 (85%) were shown to have multiple sires. In multiply sired litters, the estimated minimum number of sires ranged from two to five with an average of 2.3 males per litter. Regression analysis did not demonstrate a significant relationship between female reproductive success and female body size or sire number and female body size. There was a high incidence of reproductive skew noted in litters, and two groups of males with significantly different mean reproductive success were observed. Analyses using Bateman's principles suggest that there is less direct benefit for females that acquire multiple mates than for males who bias paternity within litters. In light of past morphological and behavioural studies, these data suggest that patterns of polyandry in elasmobranchs may be determined by coercive mating, and that breeding behaviour has likely evolved in the context of sexual conflict.

          Related collections

          Author and article information

          Journal
          Mol. Ecol.
          Molecular ecology
          Wiley-Blackwell
          0962-1083
          0962-1083
          Jan 2007
          : 16
          : 1
          Affiliations
          [1 ] Virginia Institute of Marine Science, College of William and Mary, PO Box 1346, Gloucester Point, VA 23062-1346, USA. dsport@vims.edu
          Article
          MEC3138
          10.1111/j.1365-294X.2006.03138.x
          17181730
          1c609afb-3e54-4223-ac51-d66678af5bb5

          Comments

          Comment on this article