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      Targeting Recovery from Acute Kidney Injury: Executive Summary from the Round Table Conference at the 19th International Conference on Continuous Renal Replacement Therapies (Manchester Grand Hyatt, San Diego, Calif., USA, March 2-3, 2014)

      a , b

      Nephron Clinical Practice

      S. Karger AG

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          Most cited references 9

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          Dialysis-requiring acute renal failure increases the risk of progressive chronic kidney disease.

          To determine whether acute renal failure (ARF) increases the long-term risk of progressive chronic kidney disease (CKD), we studied the outcome of patients whose initial kidney function was normal or near normal but who had an episode of dialysis-requiring ARF and did not develop end-stage renal disease within 30 days following hospital discharge. The study encompassed 556,090 adult members of Kaiser Permanente of Northern California hospitalized over an 8 year period, who had pre-admission estimated glomerular filtration rates (eGFR) equivalent to or greater than 45 ml/min/1.73 m(2) and who survived hospitalization. After controlling for potential confounders such as baseline level of eGFR and diabetes status, dialysis-requiring ARF was independently associated with a 28-fold increase in the risk of developing stage 4 or 5 CKD and more than a twofold increased risk of death. Our study shows that in a large, community-based cohort of patients with pre-existing normal or near normal kidney function, an episode of dialysis-requiring ARF was a strong independent risk factor for a long-term risk of progressive CKD and mortality.
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            Association between AKI and long-term renal and cardiovascular outcomes in United States veterans.

            AKI is associated with major adverse kidney events (MAKE): death, new dialysis, and worsened renal function. CKD (arising from worsened renal function) is associated with a higher risk of major adverse cardiac events (MACE): myocardial infarction (MI), stroke, and heart failure. Therefore, the study hypothesis was that veterans who develop AKI during hospitalization for an MI would be at higher risk of subsequent MACE and MAKE.
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              Renal oxygenation and haemodynamics in acute kidney injury and chronic kidney disease.

              Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a major burden on health systems and may arise from multiple initiating insults, including ischaemia-reperfusion injury, cardiovascular surgery, radiocontrast administration and sepsis. Similarly, the incidence and prevalence of chronic kidney disease (CKD) continues to increase, with significant morbidity and mortality. Moreover, an increasing number of AKI patients survive to develop CKD and end-stage renal disease. Although the mechanisms for the development of AKI and progression to CKD remain poorly understood, initial impairment of oxygen balance likely constitutes a common pathway, causing renal tissue hypoxia and ATP starvation that, in turn, induce extracellular matrix production, collagen deposition and fibrosis. Thus, possible future strategies for one or both conditions may involve dopamine, loop diuretics, atrial natriuretic peptide and inhibitors of inducible nitric oxide synthase, substances that target kidney oxygen consumption and regulators of renal oxygenation, such as nitric oxide and heme oxygenase-1. © 2012 The Authors Clinical and Experimental Pharmacology and Physiology © 2012 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                NEC
                Nephron Clin Pract
                10.1159/issn.1660-2110
                Nephron Clinical Practice
                S. Karger AG
                1660-2110
                2014
                September 2014
                24 September 2014
                : 127
                : 1-4
                : 1-3
                Affiliations
                aDivision of Nephrology-Hypertension, Department of Medicine, University of California San Diego, San Diego, Calif., and bThe Center for Critical Care Nephrology, CRISMA (Clinical Research, Investigation, and Systems Modeling of Acute Illness) Center, Department of Critical Care Medicine, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, Pa., USA
                Article
                365735 PMC4220039 Nephron Clin Pract 2014;127:1-3
                10.1159/000365735
                PMC4220039
                25343811
                © 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel

                Copyright: All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be translated into other languages, reproduced or utilized in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopying, recording, microcopying, or by any information storage and retrieval system, without permission in writing from the publisher. Drug Dosage: The authors and the publisher have exerted every effort to ensure that drug selection and dosage set forth in this text are in accord with current recommendations and practice at the time of publication. However, in view of ongoing research, changes in government regulations, and the constant flow of information relating to drug therapy and drug reactions, the reader is urged to check the package insert for each drug for any changes in indications and dosage and for added warnings and precautions. This is particularly important when the recommended agent is a new and/or infrequently employed drug. Disclaimer: The statements, opinions and data contained in this publication are solely those of the individual authors and contributors and not of the publishers and the editor(s). The appearance of advertisements or/and product references in the publication is not a warranty, endorsement, or approval of the products or services advertised or of their effectiveness, quality or safety. The publisher and the editor(s) disclaim responsibility for any injury to persons or property resulting from any ideas, methods, instructions or products referred to in the content or advertisements.

                Page count
                Pages: 3
                Categories
                Introduction

                Cardiovascular Medicine, Nephrology

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