Blog
About

64
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
0 collections
    4
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: found
      • Article: not found

      What is satisfying about satisfying events? Testing 10 candidate psychological needs.

      Journal of Personality and Social Psychology

      Regression Analysis, Affect, Cross-Cultural Comparison, Factor Analysis, Statistical, Happiness, Humans, Korea, Missouri, Personal Satisfaction, Psychological Theory

      Read this article at

      ScienceOpenPubMed
      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Abstract

          Three studies compared 10 candidate psychological needs in an attempt to determine which are truly most fundamental for humans. Participants described "most satisfying events" within their lives and then rated the salience of each of the 10 candidate needs within these events. Supporting self-determination theory postulates (Ryan & Deci, 2000)--autonomy, competence, and relatedness, were consistently among the top 4 needs, in terms of both their salience and their association with event-related affect. Self-esteem was also important, whereas self-actualization or meaning, physical thriving, popularity or influence, and money-luxury were less important. This basic pattern emerged within three different time frames and within both U.S. and South Korean samples and also within a final study that asked, "What's unsatisfying about unsatisfying events?" Implications for hierarchical theories of needs are discussed.

          Related collections

          Most cited references 16

          • Record: found
          • Abstract: not found
          • Article: not found

          Development and validation of brief measures of positive and negative affect: The PANAS scale

            Bookmark
            • Record: found
            • Abstract: not found
            • Article: not found

            The Family of Ln2Ti2S2O5 Compounds (Ln=Nd Sm Gd Tb Dy Ho Er and Y) Optical Properties

              Bookmark
              • Record: found
              • Abstract: found
              • Article: not found

              Goal striving, need satisfaction, and longitudinal well-being: the self-concordance model.

              An integrative model of the conative process, which has important ramifications for psychological need satisfaction and hence for individuals' well-being, is presented. The self-concordance of goals (i.e., their consistency with the person's developing interests and core values) plays a dual role in the model. First, those pursuing self-concordant goals put more sustained effort into achieving those goals and thus are more likely to attain them. Second, those who attain self-concordant goals reap greater well-being benefits from their attainment. Attainment-to-well-being effects are mediated by need satisfaction, i.e., daily activity-based experiences of autonomy, competence, and relatedness that accumulate during the period of striving. The model is shown to provide a satisfactory fit to 3 longitudinal data sets and to be independent of the effects of self-efficacy, implementation intentions, avoidance framing, and life skills.
                Bookmark

                Author and article information

                Journal
                11220449

                Comments

                Comment on this article