4
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
0 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: not found
      • Article: not found

      Self-care and manual ability in preschool children with cerebral palsy: a longitudinal study

      Read this article at

      ScienceOpenPublisher
      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Related collections

          Most cited references 25

          • Record: found
          • Abstract: found
          • Article: not found

          Development of the Gross Motor Function Classification System for cerebral palsy.

          The Gross Motor Function Classification System (GMFCS) for cerebral palsy has been widely used internationally for clinical, research, and administrative purposes. This paper recounts the ideas and work behind the creation of the GMFCS, reports on the lessons learned, and identifies some philosophical challenges inherent in trying to develop an ordered, valid, and consistent system to describe function in children and adolescents with developmental differences. It is hoped that these ideas will be useful to others who choose to expand the field with additional systems in other areas of childhood neurodisability.
            Bookmark
            • Record: found
            • Abstract: found
            • Article: not found

            Relationship among the Manual Ability Classification System (MACS), the Gross Motor Function Classification System (GMFCS), and the functional status (WeeFIM) in children with spastic cerebral palsy.

            The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship among functional classification systems, the Manual Ability Classification System (MACS), the Gross Motor Function Classification System (GMFCS), and the functional status (WeeFIM) in children with spastic cerebral palsy (CP). One hundred and eighty-five children with spastic CP (101 males, 84 females), 65 (35.1%) diparetic, 60 (32.4%) quadriparetic, and 60 (32.4%) hemiparetic children, ranging from 4 to 15 years of age with a median age of 7 years, were included in the study. The children were classified according to the GMFCS for their motor function and according to the MACS for the functioning of their hands when handling objects in daily activities. The functional status and performance were assessed by using the Functional Independence Measure of Children (WeeFIM). A good correlation between the GMFCS and MACS was found in all children (r = 0.735, p 0.05). The use of both the GMFCS and MACS in practice and in research areas will provide an easy, practical, and simple classification of the functional status of children with CP. The adaptation of both of these scales and WeeFIM and using these scales together give the opportunity for a detailed analysis of the functional level of children with spastic CP and reflect the differences between clinical types of CP.
              Bookmark
              • Record: found
              • Abstract: found
              • Article: not found

              Magnetic resonance imaging findings in a population-based cohort of children with cerebral palsy.

              The purpose of this study was to investigate the frequency and spectrum of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) abnormalities in a population of children with cerebral palsy (CP) who were born in the years 2000 and 2001 in Victoria, Australia. In 2000 and 2001, 221 children (126 males, 95 females; mean age 6y [SD 7mo], range 5-7y) with CP, excluding those with CP due to postneonatal causes (6% of all cases), were identified through the Victorian Cerebral Palsy Register. All medical records were systematically reviewed and all available brain imaging was comprehensively evaluated by a single senior MRI radiologist. MRI was available for 154 (70%) individuals and abnormalities were identified in 129 (84%). The study group comprised 88% with a spastic motor type CP; the distribution was hemiplegia in 33.5%, diplegia in 28.5%, and quadriplegia in 37.6% of children. Overall, pathological findings were most likely to be identified in children with spastic hemiplegia (92%) and spastic quadriplegia (84%). Abnormalities were less likely to be identified in non-spastic motor types (72%) and spastic diplegia (52%). The most common abnormalities identified on MRI were periventricular white matter injury (31%), focal ischaemic/haemorrhagic lesions (16%), diffuse encephalopathy (14%), and brain malformations (12%). Dual findings were seen in 3% of patients. This is the first study to document comprehensively the neuroimaging findings of all children identified with CP born over a consecutive 24-month period in a large geographical area.
                Bookmark

                Author and article information

                Journal
                Developmental Medicine & Child Neurology
                Dev Med Child Neurol
                Wiley
                00121622
                October 07 2018
                Affiliations
                [1 ]Queensland Cerebral Palsy and Rehabilitation Research Centre; Faculty of Medicine; The University of Queensland; Brisbane Queensland Australia
                [2 ]School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences; The University of Queensland; Brisbane Queensland Australia
                [3 ]Menzies Health Institute Queensland; Griffith University; Brisbane Queensland Australia
                [4 ]Queensland Centre for Intellectual and Developmental Disability; The University of Queensland; Brisbane Queensland Australia
                Article
                10.1111/dmcn.14049
                © 2018

                Comments

                Comment on this article