Blog
About

  • Record: found
  • Abstract: not found
  • Article: not found

Efficiency of nitrification inhibitor DMPP to reduce nitrous oxide emissions under different temperature and moisture conditions

Read this article at

ScienceOpenPublisher
Bookmark
      There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

      Related collections

      Most cited references 43

      • Record: found
      • Abstract: found
      • Article: not found

      Towards a natural system of organisms: proposal for the domains Archaea, Bacteria, and Eucarya.

      Molecular structures and sequences are generally more revealing of evolutionary relationships than are classical phenotypes (particularly so among microorganisms). Consequently, the basis for the definition of taxa has progressively shifted from the organismal to the cellular to the molecular level. Molecular comparisons show that life on this planet divides into three primary groupings, commonly known as the eubacteria, the archaebacteria, and the eukaryotes. The three are very dissimilar, the differences that separate them being of a more profound nature than the differences that separate typical kingdoms, such as animals and plants. Unfortunately, neither of the conventionally accepted views of the natural relationships among living systems--i.e., the five-kingdom taxonomy or the eukaryote-prokaryote dichotomy--reflects this primary tripartite division of the living world. To remedy this situation we propose that a formal system of organisms be established in which above the level of kingdom there exists a new taxon called a "domain." Life on this planet would then be seen as comprising three domains, the Bacteria, the Archaea, and the Eucarya, each containing two or more kingdoms. (The Eucarya, for example, contain Animalia, Plantae, Fungi, and a number of others yet to be defined). Although taxonomic structure within the Bacteria and Eucarya is not treated herein, Archaea is formally subdivided into the two kingdoms Euryarchaeota (encompassing the methanogens and their phenotypically diverse relatives) and Crenarchaeota (comprising the relatively tight clustering of extremely thermophilic archaebacteria, whose general phenotype appears to resemble most the ancestral phenotype of the Archaea.
        Bookmark
        • Record: found
        • Abstract: not found
        • Article: not found

        Soil water content and temperature as independent or confounded factors controlling soil respiration in a temperate mixed hardwood forest

          Bookmark
          • Record: found
          • Abstract: found
          • Article: not found

          Evidence that decomposition rates of organic carbon in mineral soil do not vary with temperature.

          It has been suggested that increases in temperature can accelerate the decomposition of organic carbon contained in forest mineral soil (Cs), and, therefore, that global warming should increase the release of soil organic carbon to the atmosphere. These predictions assume, however, that decay constants can be accurately derived from short-term laboratory incubations of soil or that in situ incubations of fresh litter accurately represent the temperature sensitivity of Cs decomposition. But our limited understanding of the biophysical factors that control Cs decomposition rates, and observations of only minor increases in Cs decomposition rate with temperature in longer-term forest soil heating experiments and in latitudinal comparisons of Cs decomposition rates bring these predictions into question. Here we have compiled Cs decomposition data from 82 sites on five continents. We found that Cs decomposition rates were remarkably constant across a global-scale gradient in mean annual temperature. These data suggest that Cs decomposition rates for forest soils are not controlled by temperature limitations to microbial activity, and that increased temperature alone will not stimulate the decomposition of forest-derived carbon in mineral soil.
            Bookmark

            Author and article information

            Journal
            Soil Biology and Biochemistry
            Soil Biology and Biochemistry
            Elsevier BV
            00380717
            October 2012
            October 2012
            : 53
            :
            : 82-89
            10.1016/j.soilbio.2012.04.026
            © 2012

            http://www.elsevier.com/tdm/userlicense/1.0/

            Comments

            Comment on this article