5
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
1 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: found
      • Article: found
      Is Open Access

      Efficacy and safety of sodium cantharidinate and vitamin B6 injection for the treatment of digestive system neoplasms: a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials

      Read this article at

      ScienceOpenPublisherPMC
      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Abstract

          Objective

          To systematically evaluate the efficacy and safety of sodium cantharidinate and vitamin B6 (SC/B6) combined with conventional medical treatment (CMT) for the treatment of patients with advanced digestive system neoplasms (DSNs).

          Methods

          The Cochrane Library, Embase, PubMed, Web of Science, Chinese Scientific Journal Database (VIP), China National Knowledge Infrastructure, and Wanfang databases were searched for clinical trials using SC/B6 for DSNs. Outcome measures, including therapeutic efficacy, quality of life (QoL), and adverse events, were extracted and systematically evaluated.

          Results

          Data from 24 trials including 1,825 advanced DSN patients were included. Compared with CMT alone, its combination with SC/B6 significantly improved the patients’ overall response rate (OR =2.25, 95% CI =1.83–2.76, P<0.00001), disease control rate (OR =2.41, 95% CI =1.85–3.15, P<0.00001), and QoL improvement rate (OR =2.75, 95% CI =2.13–3.55, P<0.00001). Moreover, adverse events caused by chemotherapy, including leukopenia, nausea and vomiting, gastrointestinal side effects, hepatotoxicity, diarrhea, transaminase disorder, myelosuppression, anorexia, and anemia, were significantly alleviated ( P<0.05) when SC/B6 was applied to DSN patients. Nephrotoxicity, thrombocytopenia, hand-foot syndrome, and oral mucositis were not significantly alleviated in patients receiving combination therapy ( P>0.05).

          Conclusion

          The combination of SC/B6 and CMT is more effective in treating DSNs than CMT alone. This combination alleviates the adverse effects associated with chemotherapy and improves the QoL of DSN patients, and its application in the clinic is worth promoting.

          Related collections

          Most cited references 50

          • Record: found
          • Abstract: found
          • Article: found
          Is Open Access

          Quantifying the impact of between-study heterogeneity in multivariate meta-analyses

          Measures that quantify the impact of heterogeneity in univariate meta-analysis, including the very popular I 2 statistic, are now well established. Multivariate meta-analysis, where studies provide multiple outcomes that are pooled in a single analysis, is also becoming more commonly used. The question of how to quantify heterogeneity in the multivariate setting is therefore raised. It is the univariate R 2 statistic, the ratio of the variance of the estimated treatment effect under the random and fixed effects models, that generalises most naturally, so this statistic provides our basis. This statistic is then used to derive a multivariate analogue of I 2, which we call . We also provide a multivariate H 2 statistic, the ratio of a generalisation of Cochran's heterogeneity statistic and its associated degrees of freedom, with an accompanying generalisation of the usual I 2 statistic, . Our proposed heterogeneity statistics can be used alongside all the usual estimates and inferential procedures used in multivariate meta-analysis. We apply our methods to some real datasets and show how our statistics are equally appropriate in the context of multivariate meta-regression, where study level covariate effects are included in the model. Our heterogeneity statistics may be used when applying any procedure for fitting the multivariate random effects model. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
            Bookmark
            • Record: found
            • Abstract: found
            • Article: not found

            Cantharidin, a potent and selective PP2A inhibitor, induces an oxidative stress-independent growth inhibition of pancreatic cancer cells through G2/M cell-cycle arrest and apoptosis.

            Cantharidin is an active constituent of mylabris, a traditional Chinese medicine. It is a potent and selective inhibitor of protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) that plays an important role in control of cell cycle, apoptosis, and cell-fate determination. Owing to its antitumor activity, cantharidin has been frequently used in clinical practice. In the present study, we investigated the therapeutic potential of cantharidin in pancreatic cancer. Cantharidin efficiently inhibited the growth of pancreatic cancer cells, but presented a much lighter toxicity effect against normal pancreatic duct cells. It caused G2/M cell-cycle arrest that was accompanied by the down-regulation of cyclin-dependent kinase 1 (CDK1) and up-regulation of p21 expression. It induced apoptosis and elevated the expressions of pro-apoptotic factors tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), TNF-related apoptosis inducing receptor 1 (TRAILR1), TRAILR2, Bad, Bak, and Bid, and decreased the expression of anti-apoptotic Bcl-2. Activation of caspase-8 and caspase-9 suggested that both extrinsic and intrinsic pathways are involved in the induction of apoptosis. Interestingly, unlike previous studies on other cancer cells, we found that the inhibitory role of cantharidin is independent of oxidative stress in pancreatic cancer cells. Mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs), including ERK, JNK, and p38, were activated after treatment with cantharidin. Inhibition of JNK, but not ERK or p38, alleviated the cytotoxity effect of cantharidin, suggesting cantharidin exerted its anticancer effect through the JNK-dependent way. Hence, in addition to being an attractive candidate compound with therapeutic potential, cantharidin also highlighted the possibility of using PP2A as a therapeutic target for pancreatic cancer treatment.
              Bookmark
              • Record: found
              • Abstract: found
              • Article: not found

              Traditional Chinese medicine as adjunctive therapy improves the long-term survival of lung cancer patients

              Traditional Chinese medicine is one of the popular alternative treatments for cancer, mainly enhancing host immune response and reducing adverse effect of chemotherapy. This study first explored traditional Chinese medicine treatment effect on long-term survival of lung cancer patients.
                Bookmark

                Author and article information

                Journal
                Drug Des Devel Ther
                Drug Des Devel Ther
                Drug Design, Development and Therapy
                Drug Design, Development and Therapy
                Dove Medical Press
                1177-8881
                2019
                28 December 2018
                : 13
                : 183-203
                Affiliations
                [1 ]Department of Oncology, Liaocheng People’s Hospital, Liaocheng Clinical School of Taishan Medical University, Liaocheng 252000, Shandong Province, China
                [2 ]Department of Gastroenterology, Liaocheng People’s Hospital, Liaocheng Clinical School of Taishan Medical University, Liaocheng 252000, Shandong Province, China
                [3 ]Department of Radiotherapy, Liaocheng People’s Hospital, Liaocheng Clinical School of Taishan Medical University, Liaocheng 252000, Shandong Province, China, yingsunyy@ 123456163.com
                Author notes
                Correspondence: Yingying Sun, Department of Radiotherapy, Liaocheng People’s Hospital, Liaocheng Clinical School of Taishan Medical University, Dongchang West Road, No 67, Liaocheng 252000, Shandong Province, China, Tel +86 152 7583 9331, Email yingsunyy@ 123456163.com
                Article
                dddt-13-183
                10.2147/DDDT.S190674
                6312696
                © 2019 Liu et al. This work is published and licensed by Dove Medical Press Limited

                The full terms of this license are available at https://www.dovepress.com/terms.php and incorporate the Creative Commons Attribution – Non Commercial (unported, v3.0) License ( http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/). By accessing the work you hereby accept the Terms. Non-commercial uses of the work are permitted without any further permission from Dove Medical Press Limited, provided the work is properly attributed.

                Categories
                Original Research

                Comments

                Comment on this article