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Recent Update on Microbiological Monitoring of Gastrointestinal Endoscopes after High-Level Disinfection

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      Abstract

      Endoscopy-related infections are important contributors to nosocomial infections. Endoscope reprocessing according to standard guidelines ensures high-level disinfection and prevents endoscopy-related infections. Microbiological surveillance may help in monitoring the effectiveness of gastrointestinal endoscope disinfection. The process involves microbial cultures and non-culture methods such as bioburden assays, adenosine triphosphate (ATP) bioluminescence, and quantitative polymerase chain reactions (PCRs). Surveillance culturing to monitor endoscopes after reprocessing has been recommended by a majority of organizations. Bioburden assays, ATP bioluminescence, and quantitative PCRs provide rapid and reliable measures. Each institution will have to try to establish its own surveillance guidelines.

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      Most cited references 28

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      Transmission of infection by flexible gastrointestinal endoscopy and bronchoscopy.

      Flexible endoscopy is a widely used diagnostic and therapeutic procedure. Contaminated endoscopes are the medical devices frequently associated with outbreaks of health care-associated infections. Accurate reprocessing of flexible endoscopes involves cleaning and high-level disinfection followed by rinsing and drying before storage. Most contemporary flexible endoscopes cannot be heat sterilized and are designed with multiple channels, which are difficult to clean and disinfect. The ability of bacteria to form biofilms on the inner channel surfaces can contribute to failure of the decontamination process. Implementation of microbiological surveillance of endoscope reprocessing is appropriate to detect early colonization and biofilm formation in the endoscope and to prevent contamination and infection in patients after endoscopic procedures. This review presents an overview of the infections and cross-contaminations related to flexible gastrointestinal endoscopy and bronchoscopy and illustrates the impact of biofilm on endoscope reprocessing and postendoscopic infection.
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        Transmission of infection by gastrointestinal endoscopy and bronchoscopy.

        To review reports on the transmission of infections by flexible gastrointestinal endoscopy and bronchoscopy in order to determine common infecting microorganisms, circumstances of transmission, and methods of risk reduction. Relevant English-language articles were identified through prominent review articles and a MEDLINE search (1966 to July 1992); additional references were selected from the bibliographies of identified articles. All selected articles related to transmission of infection by gastrointestinal endoscopy or bronchoscopy; 265 articles were reviewed in detail. Two hundred and eighty-one infections were transmitted by gastrointestinal endoscopy, and 96 were transmitted by gastrointestinal endoscopy, spectrum of these infections ranged from asymptomatic colonization to death. Salmonella species and Pseudomonas aeruginosa were repeatedly identified as the causative agents of infections transmitted by gastrointestinal endoscopy, and Mycobacterium tuberculosis, atypical mycobacteria, and P. aeruginosa were the most common causes of infections transmitted by bronchoscopy. One case of hepatitis B virus transmission via gastrointestinal endoscopy was documented. Major reasons for transmission were improper cleaning and disinfection procedures; the contamination of endoscopes by automatic washers; and an inability to decontaminate endoscopes, despite the use of standard disinfection techniques, because of their complex channel and valve systems. The most common agents of infection transmitted by endoscopy are Salmonella, Pseudomonas, and Mycobacterium species. To prevent endoscopic transmission of infections, recommended disinfection guidelines must be followed, the effectiveness of automatic washers must be carefully monitored, and improvements in endoscope design are needed to facilitate effective cleaning and disinfection.
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          Multisociety guideline on reprocessing flexible gastrointestinal endoscopes: 2011.

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            Author and article information

            Affiliations
            Digestive Disease Center, CHA Bundang Medical Center, CHA University, Seongnam, Korea.
            Author notes
            Correspondence: Won Hee Kim. Digestive Disease Center, CHA Bundang Medical Center, CHA University, 59 Yatap-ro, Bundang-gu, Seongnam 13496, Korea. Tel: +82-31-780-5641, Fax: +82-31-780-5219, arimd@ 123456naver.com
            Journal
            Clin Endosc
            Clin Endosc
            CE
            Clinical Endoscopy
            The Korean Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy
            2234-2400
            2234-2443
            September 2015
            30 September 2015
            : 48
            : 5
            : 369-373
            4604273
            10.5946/ce.2015.48.5.369
            Copyright © 2015 Korean Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy

            This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial License ( http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/) which permits unrestricted non-commercial use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

            Categories
            Focused Review Series: Endoscopic Disinfection in the Era of MERS

            Radiology & Imaging

            monitoring, reprocessing, endoscopes, gastrointestinal

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