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      Lysosomal acid lipase: at the crossroads of normal and atherogenic cholesterol metabolism

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          Abstract

          Unregulated cellular uptake of apolipoprotein B-containing lipoproteins in the arterial intima leads to the formation of foam cells in atherosclerosis. Lysosomal acid lipase (LAL) plays a crucial role in both lipoprotein lipid catabolism and excess lipid accumulation as it is the primary enzyme that hydrolyzes cholesteryl esters derived from both low density lipoprotein (LDL) and modified forms of LDL. Evidence suggests that as atherosclerosis progresses, accumulation of excess free cholesterol in lysosomes leads to impairment of LAL activity, resulting in accumulation of cholesteryl esters in the lysosome as well as the cytosol in foam cells. Impaired metabolism and release of cholesterol from lysosomes can lead to downstream defects in ATP-binding cassette transporter A1 regulation, needed to offload excess cholesterol from plaque foam cells. This review focuses on the role LAL plays in normal cholesterol metabolism and how the associated changes in its enzymatic activity may ultimately contribute to atherosclerosis progression.

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          Most cited references 136

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          Regulation mechanisms and signaling pathways of autophagy.

          Autophagy is a process of self-degradation of cellular components in which double-membrane autophagosomes sequester organelles or portions of cytosol and fuse with lysosomes or vacuoles for breakdown by resident hydrolases. Autophagy is upregulated in response to extra- or intracellular stress and signals such as starvation, growth factor deprivation, ER stress, and pathogen infection. Defective autophagy plays a significant role in human pathologies, including cancer, neurodegeneration, and infectious diseases. We present our current knowledge on the key genes composing the autophagy machinery in eukaryotes from yeast to mammalian cells and the signaling pathways that sense the status of different types of stress and induce autophagy for cell survival and homeostasis. We also review the recent advances on the molecular mechanisms that regulate the autophagy machinery at various levels, from transcriptional activation to post-translational protein modification.
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            Autophagy regulates lipid metabolism.

            The intracellular storage and utilization of lipids are critical to maintain cellular energy homeostasis. During nutrient deprivation, cellular lipids stored as triglycerides in lipid droplets are hydrolysed into fatty acids for energy. A second cellular response to starvation is the induction of autophagy, which delivers intracellular proteins and organelles sequestered in double-membrane vesicles (autophagosomes) to lysosomes for degradation and use as an energy source. Lipolysis and autophagy share similarities in regulation and function but are not known to be interrelated. Here we show a previously unknown function for autophagy in regulating intracellular lipid stores (macrolipophagy). Lipid droplets and autophagic components associated during nutrient deprivation, and inhibition of autophagy in cultured hepatocytes and mouse liver increased triglyceride storage in lipid droplets. This study identifies a critical function for autophagy in lipid metabolism that could have important implications for human diseases with lipid over-accumulation such as those that comprise the metabolic syndrome.
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              A gene network regulating lysosomal biogenesis and function.

              Lysosomes are organelles central to degradation and recycling processes in animal cells. Whether lysosomal activity is coordinated to respond to cellular needs remains unclear. We found that most lysosomal genes exhibit coordinated transcriptional behavior and are regulated by the transcription factor EB (TFEB). Under aberrant lysosomal storage conditions, TFEB translocated from the cytoplasm to the nucleus, resulting in the activation of its target genes. TFEB overexpression in cultured cells induced lysosomal biogenesis and increased the degradation of complex molecules, such as glycosaminoglycans and the pathogenic protein that causes Huntington's disease. Thus, a genetic program controls lysosomal biogenesis and function, providing a potential therapeutic target to enhance cellular clearing in lysosomal storage disorders and neurodegenerative diseases.
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                Author and article information

                Affiliations
                Department of Medicine, Centre for Heart Lung Innovation, Providence Health Care Research Institute at St. Paul's Hospital, University of British Columbia Vancouver, BC, Canada
                Author notes

                Edited by: Martin Merkel, Asklepios Clinic St. Georg, Germany

                Reviewed by: Rhys David Evans, University of Oxford, UK; Vishwajeet Puri, Boston University School of Medicine, USA

                *Correspondence: Gordon A. Francis, St. Paul's Hospital, Room 166 Burrard Bldg., 1081 Burrard St., Vancouver, BC, V6Z 1Y6, Canada e-mail: gordon.francis@ 123456hli.ubc.ca

                This article was submitted to Lipidology, a section of the journal Frontiers in Cell and Developmental Biology.

                Contributors
                Journal
                Front Cell Dev Biol
                Front Cell Dev Biol
                Front. Cell Dev. Biol.
                Frontiers in Cell and Developmental Biology
                Frontiers Media S.A.
                2296-634X
                02 February 2015
                2015
                : 3
                10.3389/fcell.2015.00003
                4313778
                Copyright © 2015 Dubland and Francis.

                This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (CC BY). The use, distribution or reproduction in other forums is permitted, provided the original author(s) or licensor are credited and that the original publication in this journal is cited, in accordance with accepted academic practice. No use, distribution or reproduction is permitted which does not comply with these terms.

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                Figures: 3, Tables: 0, Equations: 0, References: 138, Pages: 11, Words: 10723
                Categories
                Physiology
                Review Article

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