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      Public attitudes towards people living with dementia: A cross-sectional study in urban Japan (innovative practice)

      1 , , 2 , 1 , 2

      Dementia

      SAGE Publications

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          Abstract

          Stigma and social isolation are major challenges in building dementia friendly communities. Information is a key factor in improving knowledge and attitudes about dementia. This cross-sectional survey aimed to investigate public attitudes towards people with dementia in an urban community in Japan. Nearly 90% of the participants responded that they were able to have a good relationship with a person with dementia and help such a person if needed. However, around half of the participants would be ashamed of a family member with dementia. A multiple regression model showed that information from television and educational classes was associated with positive attitudes towards people with dementia among older adults. Information from educational classes and the Internet was likewise associated with positive attitudes among the volunteers. Increasing the availability and accessibility of information on dementia may contribute to improving public attitudes towards people with dementia.

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          Most cited references 12

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          Health and the information nonseeker: a profile.

          Despite increased information-seeking by the public, a significant percentage of those diagnosed with a serious disease such as cancer report that they do not seek or receive health information beyond that given by health care providers. This study attempts to profile these nonseekers and study possible determinants of nonseeking behaviors. Data come from the 2003 Health Information National Trends Survey, a national survey of American adults conducted by the National Cancer Institute ( N = 6,133; Nelson et al., 2004). Individuals were categorized as nonseekers or seekers and then further classified based on cancer history to yield 4 groups: nonseeker patients, the nonseeker public, seeker patients, and the seeker public. Compared to other groups, nonseeker patients came from the lowest income and education groups, and scored lower on attention to health in the media and trust in mass media health information. Nonseekers also scored lower on preventative health behaviors.
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            African American, Chinese, and Latino family caregivers' impressions of the onset and diagnosis of dementia: cross-cultural similarities and differences.

            We explored cross-cultural similarities and differences in minority family caregivers' perceptions of the onset and diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease in their relatives, with specific attention to clinical encounters. We performed a meta-synthesis of three qualitative studies conducted in Massachusetts with 22 African American, Latino, and Chinese caregivers. All participants conveyed striking similarities of thought about normalization of cognitive symptoms until one critical event, usually relocation, precipitated family awareness that an elder's behavior was not the result of "normal aging." A lack of knowledge about Alzheimer's disease, rather than culturally influenced beliefs, was the major deterrent to having an elder's memory assessed. Community physicians' failure to recognize Alzheimer's disease or refer to specialists was more problematic than language or ethnic differences. Physicians' disrespect for caregivers' concerns about memory loss was particularly noted by African Americans, stigmatization of persons with Alzheimer's disease was noted by Chinese, and fears that acculturation would end family home care was noted by Latinos. Amid ethnocultural differences, there are many similarities in needs that offer providers the possibility to unify quality improvements in Alzheimer's disease outreach, education, and physicians' services. Suggestions include providing the public with more confidential access to Alzheimer's disease information, increasing dementia awareness among community physicians, motivating clinicians to adopt culturally sensitive communication patterns, and providing community education to reduce normalization by families and stigmatization of persons with Alzheimer's disease.
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              Social capital and health: civic engagement, community size, and recall of health messages.

              We explored the effects of community integration and pluralism on recall of cardiovascular disease health information messages. With 1980-1983 data from the Minnesota Heart Health Program, we examined whether ties to community groups were associated with recall of health messages, and whether this relation was modified by size and degree of differentiation of the community. A higher level of civic engagement through ties to community groups was associated with better recall of health messages. Ties to community groups independently contributed to better message recall even after control for gender, education, and other variables. The moderating role of community size was non-significant but intriguing. Community group membership could increase exposure to health messages, providing a critical pathway for social capital to influence health promotion and, thus, public health outcomes.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Dementia
                Dementia
                SAGE Publications
                1471-3012
                1741-2684
                February 2020
                December 05 2016
                February 2020
                : 19
                : 2
                : 438-446
                Affiliations
                [1 ]Kobe City College of Nursing, Japan
                [2 ]Kobe City Office, Japan
                Article
                10.1177/1471301216682118
                © 2020

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