Blog
About

7
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
1 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: found
      • Article: found
      Is Open Access

      Oral and pharyngeal bolus transit in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

      Read this article at

      ScienceOpenPublisherPMC
      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Abstract

          Background

          Patients with respiratory diseases, such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), may have swallowing dysfunction.

          Objective

          The aim of this investigation was to evaluate the oral and pharyngeal phases of swallowing in patients with COPD.

          Methods

          We studied 16 patients with clinical manifestations and pulmonary function tests diagnosis of COPD (mean age: 68 years) and 15 nonsmoking healthy volunteers (mean age: 65 years) with normal pulmonary function tests. All subjects were submitted to clinical and videofluoroscopic evaluation of swallowing. Each subject performed in duplicate swallows of 5 mL and 10 mL of liquid bolus, paste bolus, and a solid bolus.

          Results

          In general, the duration of the events of the pharyngeal phase of swallowing was longer in COPD patients than controls. The difference was significant in the laryngeal vestibular closure, hyoid movement, and pharyngeal transit with swallows of both volumes of liquid bolus; in oral–pharyngeal transit with 5 mL paste bolus; and in pharyngeal and oral–pharyngeal transit with solid bolus. The difference between the duration of maximal laryngeal elevation and the duration of pharyngeal transit was higher in control subjects than in patients with COPD.

          Conclusion

          The results suggested that patients with COPD have a longer pharyngeal swallowing phase than normal subjects, which is associated with a decrease in the difference between the duration of maximal laryngeal elevation and the duration of pharyngeal transit.

          Related collections

          Most cited references 21

          • Record: found
          • Abstract: found
          • Article: not found

          A penetration-aspiration scale.

          The development and use of an 8-point, equal-appearing interval scale to describe penetration and aspiration events are described. Scores are determined primarily by the depth to which material passes in the airway and by whether or not material entering the airway is expelled. Intra- and interjudge reliability have been established. Clinical and scientific uses of the scale are discussed.
            Bookmark
            • Record: found
            • Abstract: found
            • Article: not found

            Reference spirometric values using techniques and equipment that meet ATS recommendations.

            Forced expiratory volumes and flows were measured in 251 healthy nonsmoking men and women using techniques and equipment that meet American Thoracic Society (ATS) recommendations. Linear regression equations using height and age alone predict spirometric parameters as well as more complex equations using additional variables. Single values for 95% confidence intervals are acceptable and should replace the commonly used method of subtracting 20% to determine the lower limit of normal for a predicted value. Our study produced predicted values for forced vital capacity and forced expiratory volume in one second that were almost identical to those predicted by Morris and associates (1) when the data from their study were modified to be compatible with the back extrapolation technique recommended by the ATS. The study of Morris and colleagues was performed at sea level in rural subjects, whereas ours was performed at an altitude of 1,400 m in urban subjects. Either the present study or the study of Morris and co-workers, modified to back extrapolation, could be recommended for predicting normal values.
              Bookmark
              • Record: found
              • Abstract: not found
              • Article: not found

              Global strategy for the diagnosis, management, and prevention of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

                Bookmark

                Author and article information

                Journal
                Int J Chron Obstruct Pulmon Dis
                Int J Chron Obstruct Pulmon Dis
                International Journal of COPD
                International Journal of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease
                Dove Medical Press
                1176-9106
                1178-2005
                2015
                05 March 2015
                : 10
                : 489-496
                Affiliations
                Department of Medicine, Medical School of Ribeirão Preto, University of São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, São Paulo, Brazil
                Author notes
                Correspondence: Roberto Oliveira Dantas, Department of Medicine, Medical School of Ribeirão Preto, University of São Paulo, 14049-900, Ribeirão Preto, São Paulo, Brazil, Tel +55 16 3602 2457, Fax +55 16 3602 0229, Email rodantas@ 123456fmrp.usp.br
                Article
                copd-10-489
                10.2147/COPD.S74945
                4356708
                © 2015 Cassiani et al. This work is published by Dove Medical Press Limited, and licensed under Creative Commons Attribution – Non Commercial (unported, v3.0) License

                The full terms of the License are available at http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/. Non-commercial uses of the work are permitted without any further permission from Dove Medical Press Limited, provided the work is properly attributed.

                Categories
                Original Research

                Respiratory medicine

                deglutition, swallowing, oral–pharyngeal transit, videofluoroscopy, copd

                Comments

                Comment on this article

                Similar content 644

                Cited by 9

                Most referenced authors 320