1
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
1 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: found
      • Article: found
      Is Open Access

      COMPARATIVE CARBON FOOTPRINT ANALYSIS OF BAMBOO AND STEEL SCAFFOLDING

      Read this article at

      ScienceOpenPublisher
      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Abstract

          Building construction and maintenance is one of the major contributors to global warming and as a result has the potential to be a leader in sustainable development. Scaffolding systems are an important component of building construction, especially high-rise buildings. A scaffold consists of a modular system of metal or bamboo tubes or pipes. Scaffolding is a temporary construction structure created for reaching heights above a human's reach, with the purpose of helping in construction or maintenance of a structure. The scaffolding industry in the US is dominated by steel. In areas where bamboo is indigenous, like many East Asian cities, bamboo is the scaffolding material of choice, even when it comes to high-rise buildings. Our goal was to analyze bamboo and steel thoroughly and establish their environmental impacts using life cycle analysis (LCA). Consequently, this study explores the ecological viability in expanding the use of bamboo scaffolding where steel predominates. The functional units used in this study are bamboo and steel scaffolding systems that are 2.74 m high, 2.49 m wide, and 1.21 m deep. A cradle-to-gate LCA was performed to evaluate the environmental performance of the two scaffolding systems. Our results suggest that bamboo scaffolding has a lower carbon footprint than steel scaffolding, with an ability to sequester carbon during its growth phase being a significant contributing factor. This is an important advantage of bamboo over nonrenewable materials (steel). Additionally, bamboo functions as a buffer, delaying the release of CO 2 after the use phase. The main challenge for any scaffolding system made from renewable materials in the western world is the demand for standardization. Therefore, an ideal future goal should be the design of standardized scaffolding systems using renewable materials that combines the durability and homogeneity of steel scaffolding with the sustainability and environmental performance of bamboo scaffolding.

          Related collections

          Most cited references 13

          • Record: found
          • Abstract: not found
          • Article: not found

          “Life Cycle Assessment of Buildings: a review.”

           A. SHARMA,  A SAXENA,  M Sethi (2011)
            Bookmark
            • Record: found
            • Abstract: not found
            • Article: not found

            “Mechanical Properties of Structural bamboo for bamboo scaffolding.”

              Bookmark
              • Record: found
              • Abstract: not found
              • Article: not found

              “Lightweight Bamboo Double Layer Grid System.”

                Bookmark

                Author and article information

                Journal
                jgrb
                Journal of Green Building
                College Publishing
                1552-6100
                1943-4618
                1943-4618
                Winter 2015
                : 10
                : 1
                : 114-126
                Author notes

                1. Graduate Research Assistant, Dept. of Wood Science and Engineering, Oregon State University

                2. Graduate Research Assistant, Dept. of Mechanical, Industrial, and Manufacturing Engineering, Oregon State University

                3. Undergraduate student, School of Civil and Construction Engineering, Oregon State University

                4. Assistant Professor, Dept. of Wood Science and Engineering, Oregon State University

                Article
                jgb.10.1.114
                10.3992/jgb.10.1.114
                ©2015 by College Publishing. All rights reserved.

                Volumes 1-10 of JOGB are open access and do not require permission for use, though proper citation should be given. To view the licenses, visit https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/

                Page count
                Pages: 13
                Product
                Categories
                RESEARCH ARTICLES

                Comments

                Comment on this article