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      The Majella National Park: a case study for the conservation of plant biodiversity in the Italian Apennines

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          Abstract

          The Majella National Park (MNP) is a tangible example of the interaction between ex-situ and in-situ conservation of endemic, rare, or endangered species at a Regional level in the context of the Italian national parks. The MNP has the facilities and carries out activities for the conservation of plant biodiversity: it includes botanical gardens, a seed bank, a nursery, and a network of “guardian farmers”, an authentic “granary” in which to protect and conserve biodiversity in and around the Majella massif (central Italy).

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          Most cited references 39

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          Constraints in the restoration of ecological diversity in grassland and heathland communities.

           J. Bakker,  F Berendse (1999)
          Species-rich grassland and heathland communities still occur in low-intensity farming systems in many European countries. Gradually, such systems have either been abandoned or more intensively exploited, with a subsequent decrease in species numbers. Until recently, it was thought that restoration of these communities would be straightforward. However, abiotic constraints (with respect to eutrophication and acidification) have hampered restoration more than previously thought. Moreover, very recent research has revealed that biotic constraints can also be important: many plant species are not present in the soil seed bank and their dispersal is limited in the present fragmented landscape.
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            Recent plant diversity changes on Europe's mountain summits.

            In mountainous regions, climate warming is expected to shift species' ranges to higher altitudes. Evidence for such shifts is still mostly from revisitations of historical sites. We present recent (2001 to 2008) changes in vascular plant species richness observed in a standardized monitoring network across Europe's major mountain ranges. Species have moved upslope on average. However, these shifts had opposite effects on the summit floras' species richness in boreal-temperate mountain regions (+3.9 species on average) and Mediterranean mountain regions (-1.4 species), probably because recent climatic trends have decreased the availability of water in the European south. Because Mediterranean mountains are particularly rich in endemic species, a continuation of these trends might shrink the European mountain flora, despite an average increase in summit species richness across the region.
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              An updated checklist of the vascular flora native to Italy

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                Author and article information

                Contributors
                (View ORCID Profile)
                Journal
                Italian Botanist
                IB
                Pensoft Publishers
                2531-4033
                August 20 2020
                August 20 2020
                : 10
                : 1-24
                Article
                10.3897/italianbotanist.10.52952
                © 2020

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