Blog
About

4
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
0 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: found
      • Article: found
      Is Open Access

      Peritumoral EpCAM Is an Independent Prognostic Marker after Curative Resection of HBV-Related Hepatocellular Carcinoma

      Read this article at

      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Abstract

          Accumulating evidence suggests that the tumor microenvironment has a profound influence on tumor initiation and progression, opening a new avenue for studying tumor biology. Nonetheless, the prognostic values of the peritumoral expression of EpCAM and CD13 remain to be elucidated in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) patients. In this study, the expression of EpCAM and CD13 was assessed by immunohistochemistry in peritumoral liver hepatocytes from 106 hepatitis B virus- (HBV-) related HCC patients who had undergone curative hepatectomy. The peritumoral EpCAM-positive group had a significantly worse overall survival (OS) ( p = 0.003) and recurrence-free survival (RFS) ( p = 0.022) compared to the negative group. Peritumoral CD13-positive patients were also associated with poor OS ( p = 0.038), while not significantly associated with RFS. The adjusted multivariate COX proportional hazard regression analysis suggested that only the positive expression of peritumoral EpCAM precisely predicted poor OS. Being peritumoral EpCAM positive was also significantly associated with a larger tumor size, liver cirrhosis, and more frequent vascular invasion; however, no statistically significant association was observed between CD13 and any clinicopathological features. Taken together, peritumoral EpCAM and CD13 expression was associated with a poor prognosis, but EpCAM may be a better prognostic marker than CD13 in HBV-related HCC patients. In the future, peritumoral EpCAM could be a good target for adjuvant therapy after curative hepatectomy.

          Related collections

          Most cited references 34

          • Record: found
          • Abstract: found
          • Article: not found

          Global cancer statistics, 2012.

          Cancer constitutes an enormous burden on society in more and less economically developed countries alike. The occurrence of cancer is increasing because of the growth and aging of the population, as well as an increasing prevalence of established risk factors such as smoking, overweight, physical inactivity, and changing reproductive patterns associated with urbanization and economic development. Based on GLOBOCAN estimates, about 14.1 million new cancer cases and 8.2 million deaths occurred in 2012 worldwide. Over the years, the burden has shifted to less developed countries, which currently account for about 57% of cases and 65% of cancer deaths worldwide. Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death among males in both more and less developed countries, and has surpassed breast cancer as the leading cause of cancer death among females in more developed countries; breast cancer remains the leading cause of cancer death among females in less developed countries. Other leading causes of cancer death in more developed countries include colorectal cancer among males and females and prostate cancer among males. In less developed countries, liver and stomach cancer among males and cervical cancer among females are also leading causes of cancer death. Although incidence rates for all cancers combined are nearly twice as high in more developed than in less developed countries in both males and females, mortality rates are only 8% to 15% higher in more developed countries. This disparity reflects regional differences in the mix of cancers, which is affected by risk factors and detection practices, and/or the availability of treatment. Risk factors associated with the leading causes of cancer death include tobacco use (lung, colorectal, stomach, and liver cancer), overweight/obesity and physical inactivity (breast and colorectal cancer), and infection (liver, stomach, and cervical cancer). A substantial portion of cancer cases and deaths could be prevented by broadly applying effective prevention measures, such as tobacco control, vaccination, and the use of early detection tests. © 2015 American Cancer Society.
            Bookmark
            • Record: found
            • Abstract: found
            • Article: not found

            Hepatocellular carcinoma.

            Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the fifth most common cause of cancer, and its incidence is increasing worldwide because of the dissemination of hepatitis B and C virus infection. Patients with cirrhosis are at the highest risk and should be monitored every 6 months. Surveillance can lead to diagnosis at early stages, when the tumour might be curable by resection, liver transplantation, or percutaneous treatment. In the West and Japan, these treatments can be applied to 30% of patients, and result in 5-year survival rates higher than 50%. Resection is indicated among patients who have one tumour and well-preserved liver function. Liver transplantation benefits patients who have decompensated cirrhosis and one tumour smaller than 5 cm or three nodules smaller than 3 cm, but donor shortage greatly limits its applicability. This difficulty might be overcome by living donation. Most HCC patients are diagnosed at advanced stages and receive palliative treatments, which have been assessed in the setting of 63 randomised controlled trials during the past 25 years. Meta-analysis shows that only chemoembolisation improves survival in well-selected patients with unresectable HCC.
              Bookmark
              • Record: found
              • Abstract: found
              • Article: not found

              EpCAM-positive hepatocellular carcinoma cells are tumor-initiating cells with stem/progenitor cell features.

              Cancer progression/metastases and embryonic development share many properties including cellular plasticity, dynamic cell motility, and integral interaction with the microenvironment. We hypothesized that the heterogeneous nature of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), in part, may be owing to the presence of hepatic cancer cells with stem/progenitor features. Gene expression profiling and immunohistochemistry analyses were used to analyze 235 tumor specimens derived from 2 recently identified HCC subtypes (EpCAM(+) alpha-fetoprotein [AFP(+)] HCC and EpCAM(-) AFP(-) HCC). These subtypes differed in their expression of AFP, a molecule produced in the developing embryo, and EpCAM, a cell surface hepatic stem cell marker. Fluorescence-activated cell sorting was used to isolate EpCAM(+) HCC cells, which were tested for hepatic stem/progenitor cell properties. Gene expression and pathway analyses revealed that the EpCAM(+) AFP(+) HCC subtype had features of hepatic stem/progenitor cells. Indeed, the fluorescence-activated cell sorting-isolated EpCAM(+) HCC cells displayed hepatic cancer stem cell-like traits including the abilities to self-renew and differentiate. Moreover, these cells were capable of initiating highly invasive HCC in nonobese diabetic, severe combined immunodeficient mice. Activation of Wnt/beta-catenin signaling enriched the EpCAM(+) cell population, whereas RNA interference-based blockage of EpCAM, a Wnt/beta-catenin signaling target, attenuated the activities of these cells. Taken together, our results suggest that HCC growth and invasiveness is dictated by a subset of EpCAM(+) cells, opening a new avenue for HCC cancer cell eradication by targeting Wnt/beta-catenin signaling components such as EpCAM.
                Bookmark

                Author and article information

                Affiliations
                1Cancer Center, Union Hospital, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, 1277 Jiefang Ave., Wuhan, Hubei 430022, China
                2Department of Pediatrics, Tianyou Hospital, Wuhan University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, Hubei 430064, China
                3Department of Surgery, Prince of Wales Hospital, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Shatin, New Territories, Hong Kong
                Author notes

                Academic Editor: Stamatios E. Theocharis

                Journal
                Dis Markers
                Dis. Markers
                DM
                Disease Markers
                Hindawi
                0278-0240
                1875-8630
                2017
                10 May 2017
                : 2017
                10.1155/2017/8495326
                5442434
                Copyright © 2017 Xiao-Meng Dai et al.

                This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

                Funding
                Funded by: Huazhong University of Science and Technology
                Award ID: WJ2016-YZ-10
                Award ID: 2016YXMS241
                Categories
                Research Article

                Comments

                Comment on this article