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      Re-imagining motor imagery: Building bridges between cognitive neuroscience and sport psychology : Re-imagining motor imagery

      , , ,
      British Journal of Psychology
      Wiley

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          Abstract

          One of the most remarkable capacities of the mind is its ability to simulate sensations, actions, and other types of experience. A mental simulation process that has attracted recent attention from cognitive neuroscientists and sport psychologists is motor imagery or the mental rehearsal of actions without engaging in the actual physical movements involved. Research on motor imagery is important in psychology because it provides an empirical window on consciousness and movement planning, rectifies a relative neglect of non-visual types of mental imagery, and has practical implications for skill learning and skilled performance in special populations (e.g., athletes, surgeons). Unfortunately, contemporary research on motor imagery is hampered by a variety of semantic, conceptual, and methodological issues that prevent cross-fertilization of ideas between cognitive neuroscience and sport psychology. In this paper, we review these issues, suggest how they can be resolved, and sketch some potentially fruitful new directions for inter-disciplinary research in motor imagery. ©2011 The British Psychological Society.

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            Six views of embodied cognition.

            The emerging viewpoint of embodied cognition holds that cognitive processes are deeply rooted in the body's interactions with the world. This position actually houses a number of distinct claims, some of which are more controversial than others. This paper distinguishes and evaluates the following six claims: (1) cognition is situated; (2) cognition is time-pressured; (3) we off-load cognitive work onto the environment; (4) the environment is part of the cognitive system; (5) cognition is for action; (6) off-line cognition is body based. Of these, the first three and the fifth appear to be at least partially true, and their usefulness is best evaluated in terms of the range of their applicability. The fourth claim, I argue, is deeply problematic. The sixth claim has received the least attention in the literature on embodied cognition, but it may in fact be the best documented and most powerful of the six claims.
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              Does mental practice enhance performance?

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                Author and article information

                Journal
                British Journal of Psychology
                Wiley
                00071269
                May 2012
                May 2012
                September 07 2011
                : 103
                : 2
                : 224-247
                Article
                10.1111/j.2044-8295.2011.02068.x
                22506748
                1ede9b30-f06f-4bdd-8a77-b55655a18511
                © 2011

                http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/tdm_license_1.1

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