Blog
About

0
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
1 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: found
      • Article: found

      Autoantibodies against β1 Receptor and AT1 Receptor in Type 2 Diabetes Patients with Left Ventricular Dilatation

      Read this article at

      ScienceOpenPublisherPubMed
      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Abstract

          Objectives: To explore the relationship between the autoantibodies against the β1 and AT1 receptors and left ventricular dilatation in patients with type 2 diabetes (T2DM). Methods: The autoantibodies against the β1 and angiotensin II type 1 (AT1) receptors of T2DM patients with and without hypertension were screened by ELISA. Multiple logistic regression was used to analyze the risk factors for left ventricular dilatation. The reversing effect of left ventricular dilatation was evaluated after receptor blocker treatment. Results: The positive rates of autoantibodies against the β1 and AT1 receptors (43.0 and 44.1%, respectively) in T2DM patients with hypertension were significantly higher than those in normotensive patients (16.0 and 10.4%, respectively; all p < 0.01). Furthermore, among T2DM patients with hypertension, the positive rates (61.4 and 64.9%, respectively) in patients with left ventricular dilatation were remarkably higher than those with normal left ventricular dimensions (34.4 and 36.1%, respectively; all p < 0.01). The presence of β1 receptor antibody and AT1 receptor antibody were risk factors for left ventricular dilatation (p < 0.05). The curative effect of metoprolol tartrate and valsartan in reversing left ventricular hypertrophy in the group positive for autoantibodies was much better than in the negative group. Conclusion: The findings show that autoantibodies against the β1 and AT1 receptors may play a role in predicting left ventricular dilatation in T2DM patients in combination with hypertension. Metoprolol tartrate and valsartan are effective and safe in the treatment of these patients.

          Related collections

          Most cited references 26

          • Record: found
          • Abstract: found
          • Article: not found

          Autoantibodies against AT1-receptor and alpha1-adrenergic receptor in patients with hypertension.

          This study will explore the autoantibodies against AT1-receptor and alpha1-adrenergic receptor in patients with hypertension. Forty normotensives and 194 patients with hypertension were recruited for participation in this study. All patients accepted systemic combination drug treatment for antihypertension. According to the treatment results and the definition of refractory hypertension, the patients were divided into two groups: a refractory hypertension group and a non-refractory hypertension group. The epitope of the 2nd extracellular loop of type 1 angiotensin (AT1) receptor and alpha1-adrenergic receptor were synthesized and used as antigens to screen the autoantibodies against AT1-receptor and alpha1-adrenergic receptor by ELISA. The plasma renin activity and concentration of angiotensin II and catecholamine were also examined. The positive rates of the autoantibodies against AT1-receptor and alpha1-adrenergic receptor in patients with hypertension, 26.8% (52/194) and 25.3% (49/194), respectively, were higher than those in normotensives (7.5% and 5%)(p < 0.01). Further investigation showed that the frequencies of the autoantibodies against AT1-receptor and alpha1-adrenergic receptor in patients with refractory hypertension, 42.9% (42/98) and 36.7% (36/98), respectively, were higher than those in patients with non-refractory hypertension under systematic treatment (10.4% and 13.5%)(p < 0.01). The levels of circulating angiotensin II, catecholamine, proteinuria and serum creatine were also higher in the refractory hypertension group than in the non-refractory hypertension group. The findings showed that the frequencies of autoantibodies against AT1-receptor and alpha1-adrenergic receptor were higher in patients with hypertension, particularly in those with refractory hypertension, and that these autoantibodies might play a role in the pathogenesis of hypertension.
            Bookmark
            • Record: found
            • Abstract: found
            • Article: not found

            AT1 receptor mediated augmentation of intrarenal angiotensinogen in angiotensin II-dependent hypertension.

            Angiotensin (Ang) II-infused hypertensive rats exhibit increases in renal angiotensinogen mRNA and protein, as well as urinary angiotensinogen excretion in association with increased intrarenal Ang II content. The present study was performed to determine if the augmentation of intrarenal angiotensinogen requires activation of Ang II type 1 (AT1) receptors. Male Sprague-Dawley rats (200 to 220 g) were divided into 3 groups: sham surgery (n=10), subcutaneous infusion of Ang II (80 ng/min, n=11), and Ang II infusion plus AT1 blocker (ARB), olmesartan (5 mg/d, n=12). Ang II infusion progressively increased systolic blood pressure (SBP) compared with sham (178+/-8 mm Hg versus 119+/-4 at day 11). ARB treatment prevented hypertension (113+/-6 at day 11). Twenty-four-hour urine collections were taken at day 12, and plasma and tissue samples were harvested at day 13. The Ang II+ARB group had a significant increase in plasma Ang II compared with Ang II and sham groups (365+/-46 fmol/mL versus 76+/-9 and 45+/-14, respectively). Nevertheless, ARB treatment markedly limited the enhancement of kidney Ang II by Ang II infusion (65+/-17 fmol/g in sham, 606+/-147 in Ang II group, and 288+/-28 in Ang II+ARB group). Ang II infusion significantly increased kidney angiotensinogen compared with sham (1.69+/-0.21 densitometric units versus 1.00+/-0.17). This change was reflected by increased angiotensinogen immunostaining in proximal tubules. ARB treatment prevented this increase (1.14+/-0.12). Urinary angiotensinogen excretion rates were enhanced 4.7x in Ang II group (4.67+/-0.41 densitometric units versus 1.00+/-0.21) but ARB treatment prevented the augmentation of urinary angiotensinogen (0.96+/-0.23). These data demonstrate that augmentation of intrarenal angiotensinogen in Ang II-infused rats is AT1-dependent and provide further evidence that urinary angiotensinogen is closely linked to intrarenal Ang II in Ang II-dependent hypertension.
              Bookmark
              • Record: found
              • Abstract: found
              • Article: not found

              Autoantibodies against the angiotensin receptor (AT1) in patients with hypertension.

              Sera from patients with malignant essential hypertension (n = 14), malignant secondary hypertension mainly attributable to renovascular diseases (n = 12) and renovascular diseases without malignant hypertension (n = 11) and from normotensive healthy blood donors (n = 35) were studied for the presence of autoantibodies against G-protein-coupled cardiovascular receptors. Autoantibodies against the angiotensin II receptor (AT1) were detected in 14, 33, 18 and 14% of patients with malignant essential hypertension, malignant secondary hypertension, renovascular diseases and control patients, respectively. Sensitivity of the enzyme immunoassay was assessed as 5 microg/ml IgG. Patients did not show antibodies against bradykinin (B2) or angiotensin II subtype 2 (AT2) receptors. Autoantibodies affinity-purified from positive patients localized AT receptors in Chinese hamster ovary transfected cells, and displayed a positive chronotropic effect on cultured neonatal rat cardiomyocytes. These results demonstrate the existence of autoantibodies against a functional extracellular domain of human AT1 receptors in patients with malignant hypertension, and suggest that these autoantibodies might be involved in the pathogenesis of malignant hypertension.
                Bookmark

                Author and article information

                Journal
                CRD
                Cardiology
                10.1159/issn.0008-6312
                Cardiology
                S. Karger AG
                0008-6312
                1421-9751
                2014
                October 2014
                11 October 2014
                : 129
                : 3
                : 191-196
                Affiliations
                aDepartment of Endocrinology, Guangzhou Command Wuhan General Hospital, Wuhan, and bSouthern Medical University, Guangzhou, PR China
                Author notes
                *Linshuang Zhao, Department of Endocrinology, Guangzhou Command Wuhan General Hospital, Wuhan, Hubei, 430070 (PR China), E-Mail zls7111@aliyun.com
                Article
                365782 Cardiology 2014;129:191-196
                10.1159/000365782
                25323488
                © 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel

                Copyright: All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be translated into other languages, reproduced or utilized in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopying, recording, microcopying, or by any information storage and retrieval system, without permission in writing from the publisher. Drug Dosage: The authors and the publisher have exerted every effort to ensure that drug selection and dosage set forth in this text are in accord with current recommendations and practice at the time of publication. However, in view of ongoing research, changes in government regulations, and the constant flow of information relating to drug therapy and drug reactions, the reader is urged to check the package insert for each drug for any changes in indications and dosage and for added warnings and precautions. This is particularly important when the recommended agent is a new and/or infrequently employed drug. Disclaimer: The statements, opinions and data contained in this publication are solely those of the individual authors and contributors and not of the publishers and the editor(s). The appearance of advertisements or/and product references in the publication is not a warranty, endorsement, or approval of the products or services advertised or of their effectiveness, quality or safety. The publisher and the editor(s) disclaim responsibility for any injury to persons or property resulting from any ideas, methods, instructions or products referred to in the content or advertisements.

                Page count
                Tables: 4, Pages: 6
                Categories
                Original Research

                Comments

                Comment on this article