14
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
0 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: not found
      • Article: not found

      Recent Advances in Direct Catalytic Asymmetric Transformations under Proton-Transfer Conditions

      ,

      Angewandte Chemie International Edition

      Wiley-Blackwell

      Read this article at

      ScienceOpenPublisher
      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Related collections

          Most cited references 199

          • Record: found
          • Abstract: found
          • Article: not found

          The atom economy--a search for synthetic efficiency.

           B. Trost (1991)
          Efficient synthetic methods required to assemble complex molecular arrays include reactions that are both selective (chemo-, regio-, diastereo-, and enantio-) and economical in atom count (maximum number of atoms of reactants appearing in the products). Methods that involve simply combining two or more building blocks with any other reactant needed only catalytically constitute the highest degree of atom economy. Transition metal-catalyzed methods that are both selective and economical for formation of cyclic structures, of great interest for biological purposes, represent an important starting point for this long-term goal. The limited availability of raw materials, combined with environmental concerns, require the highlighting of these goals.
            Bookmark
            • Record: found
            • Abstract: not found
            • Article: not found

            From Molecules to Crystal Engineering:  Supramolecular Isomerism and Polymorphism in Network Solids

              Bookmark
              • Record: found
              • Abstract: found
              • Article: not found

              A homochiral metal-organic porous material for enantioselective separation and catalysis

              Inorganic zeolites are used for many practical applications that exploit the microporosity intrinsic to their crystal structures. Organic analogues, which are assembled from modular organic building blocks linked through non-covalent interactions, are of interest for similar applications. These range from catalysis, separation and sensor technology to optoelectronics, with enantioselective separation and catalysis being especially important for the chemical and pharmaceutical industries. The modular construction of these analogues allows flexible and rational design, as both the architecture and chemical functionality of the micropores can, in principle, be precisely controlled. Porous organic solids with large voids and high framework stability have been produced, and investigations into the range of accessible pore functionalities have been initiated. For example, catalytically active organic zeolite analogues are known, as are chiral metal-organic open-framework materials. However, the latter are only available as racemic mixtures, or lack the degree of framework stability or void space that is required for practical applications. Here we report the synthesis of a homochiral metal-organic porous material that allows the enantioselective inclusion of metal complexes in its pores and catalyses a transesterification reaction in an enantioselective manner. Our synthesis strategy, which uses enantiopure metal-organic clusters as secondary building blocks, should be readily applicable to chemically modified cluster components and thus provide access to a wide range of porous organic materials suitable for enantioselective separation and catalysis.
                Bookmark

                Author and article information

                Journal
                Angewandte Chemie International Edition
                Angew. Chem. Int. Ed.
                Wiley-Blackwell
                14337851
                May 16 2011
                May 16 2011
                : 50
                : 21
                : 4760-4772
                Article
                10.1002/anie.201100918
                © 2011
                Product

                Comments

                Comment on this article