Blog
About

2
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
0 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: found
      • Article: not found

      The beneficial effects of a positive attention bias amongst children with a history of psychosocial deprivation.

      Read this article at

      ScienceOpenPublisherPMC
      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Abstract

          Children raised in institutions experience psychosocial deprivation that has detrimental influences on attention and mental health. The current study examined patterns of attention biases in children from institutions who were randomized at approximately 21.6 months to receive either a high-quality foster care intervention or care-as-usual. At age 12, children performed a dot-probe task and indices of attention bias were calculated. Additionally, children completed a social stress paradigm and cortisol reactivity was computed. Children randomized into foster care (N=40) exhibited an attention bias toward positive stimuli but not threat, whereas children who received care-as-usual (N=40) and a never-institutionalized comparison group (N=47) showed no bias. Stability of foster care placement was related to positive bias, while instability of foster care placement was related to threat bias. The magnitude of the positive bias was associated with fewer internalizing problems and better coping mechanisms. Within the foster care group, positive attention bias was related to less blunted cortisol reactivity.

          Related collections

          Author and article information

          Journal
          Biol Psychol
          Biological psychology
          Elsevier BV
          1873-6246
          0301-0511
          Jan 2017
          : 122
          Affiliations
          [1 ] Department of Human Development and Quantitative Methodology, University of Maryland, College Park, United States. Electronic address: str@umd.edu.
          [2 ] Department of Psychology, University of Washington, Seattle, United States.
          [3 ] Department of Psychology and Neuroscience, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, United States.
          [4 ] Harvard Medical School, United States; Boston Children's Hospital, United States; Harvard Center on the Developing Child, United States; Harvard Graduate School of Education, United States.
          [5 ] Tulane University School of Medicine, New Orleans, United States.
          [6 ] Department of Human Development and Quantitative Methodology, University of Maryland, College Park, United States.
          S0301-0511(16)30101-6 NIHMS782814
          10.1016/j.biopsycho.2016.04.008
          5074922
          27109625

          Comments

          Comment on this article