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      RefSeq: an update on mammalian reference sequences

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          Abstract

          The National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) Reference Sequence (RefSeq) database is a collection of annotated genomic, transcript and protein sequence records derived from data in public sequence archives and from computation, curation and collaboration ( http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/refseq/). We report here on growth of the mammalian and human subsets, changes to NCBI’s eukaryotic annotation pipeline and modifications affecting transcript and protein records. Recent changes to NCBI’s eukaryotic genome annotation pipeline provide higher throughput, and the addition of RNAseq data to the pipeline results in a significant expansion of the number of transcripts and novel exons annotated on mammalian RefSeq genomes. Recent annotation changes include reporting supporting evidence for transcript records, modification of exon feature annotation and the addition of a structured report of gene and sequence attributes of biological interest. We also describe a revised protein annotation policy for alternatively spliced transcripts with more divergent predicted proteins and we summarize the current status of the RefSeqGene project.

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          Most cited references 15

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          Update on activities at the Universal Protein Resource (UniProt) in 2013

          The mission of the Universal Protein Resource (UniProt) (http://www.uniprot.org) is to support biological research by providing a freely accessible, stable, comprehensive, fully classified, richly and accurately annotated protein sequence knowledgebase. It integrates, interprets and standardizes data from numerous resources to achieve the most comprehensive catalogue of protein sequences and functional annotation. UniProt comprises four major components, each optimized for different uses, the UniProt Archive, the UniProt Knowledgebase, the UniProt Reference Clusters and the UniProt Metagenomic and Environmental Sequence Database. UniProt is produced by the UniProt Consortium, which consists of groups from the European Bioinformatics Institute (EBI), the SIB Swiss Institute of Bioinformatics (SIB) and the Protein Information Resource (PIR). UniProt is updated and distributed every 4 weeks and can be accessed online for searches or downloads.
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            Is Open Access

            McKusick's Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM®)

            McKusick's Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM®; http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/omim), a knowledgebase of human genes and phenotypes, was originally published as a book, Mendelian Inheritance in Man, in 1966. The content of OMIM is derived exclusively from the published biomedical literature and is updated daily. It currently contains 18 961 full-text entries describing phenotypes and genes. To date, 2239 genes have mutations causing disease, and 3770 diseases have a molecular basis. Approximately 70 new entries are added and 700 entries are updated per month. OMIM® is expanding content and organization in response to shifting biological paradigms and advancing biotechnology.
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              The consensus coding sequence (CCDS) project: Identifying a common protein-coding gene set for the human and mouse genomes.

              Effective use of the human and mouse genomes requires reliable identification of genes and their products. Although multiple public resources provide annotation, different methods are used that can result in similar but not identical representation of genes, transcripts, and proteins. The collaborative consensus coding sequence (CCDS) project tracks identical protein annotations on the reference mouse and human genomes with a stable identifier (CCDS ID), and ensures that they are consistently represented on the NCBI, Ensembl, and UCSC Genome Browsers. Importantly, the project coordinates on manually reviewing inconsistent protein annotations between sites, as well as annotations for which new evidence suggests a revision is needed, to progressively converge on a complete protein-coding set for the human and mouse reference genomes, while maintaining a high standard of reliability and biological accuracy. To date, the project has identified 20,159 human and 17,707 mouse consensus coding regions from 17,052 human and 16,893 mouse genes. Three evaluation methods indicate that the entries in the CCDS set are highly likely to represent real proteins, more so than annotations from contributing groups not included in CCDS. The CCDS database thus centralizes the function of identifying well-supported, identically-annotated, protein-coding regions.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Nucleic Acids Res
                Nucleic Acids Res
                nar
                nar
                Nucleic Acids Research
                Oxford University Press
                0305-1048
                1362-4962
                January 2014
                19 November 2013
                19 November 2013
                : 42
                : D1 , Database issue
                : D756-D763
                Affiliations
                National Center for Biotechnology Information, National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health, 8600 Rockville Pike, Bethesda, MD 20894, USA
                Author notes
                *To whom correspondence should be addressed. Tel: +1 301 435 5898; Fax: +1 301 435 5898; Email: pruitt@ 123456ncbi.nlm.nih.gov
                Article
                gkt1114
                10.1093/nar/gkt1114
                3965018
                24259432
                Published by Oxford University Press 2013. This work is written by US Government employees and is in the public domain in the US.
                Page count
                Pages: 8
                Categories
                V. Human genome, model organisms, comparative genomics
                Custom metadata
                1 January 2014

                Genetics

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