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      Highly Fluorescent, Water-Soluble, Size-Tunable Gold Quantum Dots

      , ,
      Physical Review Letters
      American Physical Society (APS)

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          Abstract

          Highly fluorescent, water-soluble, few-atom Au quantum dots have been created that behave as multielectron artificial atoms with discrete, size-tunable electronic transitions throughout the visible and near IR. Correlation of nanodot sizes with emission energies fits the simple relation, EFermi/N1/3, predicted by the jellium model. Providing the "missing link" between atomic and nanoparticle behavior in noble metals, these emissive, water-soluble Au nanoclusters open new opportunities for biological labels, energy transfer pairs, and light emitting sources in nanoscale optoelectronics.

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          Semiconductor Clusters, Nanocrystals, and Quantum Dots

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            Electron–electron and electron-hole interactions in small semiconductor crystallites: The size dependence of the lowest excited electronic state

            L. Brus (1984)
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              In vivo imaging of quantum dots encapsulated in phospholipid micelles.

              Fluorescent semiconductor nanocrystals (quantum dots) have the potential to revolutionize biological imaging, but their use has been limited by difficulties in obtaining nanocrystals that are biocompatible. To address this problem, we encapsulated individual nanocrystals in phospholipid block-copolymer micelles and demonstrated both in vitro and in vivo imaging. When conjugated to DNA, the nanocrystal-micelles acted as in vitro fluorescent probes to hybridize to specific complementary sequences. Moreover, when injected into Xenopus embryos, the nanocrystal-micelles were stable, nontoxic (<5 x 10(9) nanocrystals per cell), cell autonomous, and slow to photobleach. Nanocrystal fluorescence could be followed to the tadpole stage, allowing lineage-tracing experiments in embryogenesis.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                PRLTAO
                Physical Review Letters
                Phys. Rev. Lett.
                American Physical Society (APS)
                0031-9007
                1079-7114
                August 2004
                August 13 2004
                : 93
                : 7
                Article
                10.1103/PhysRevLett.93.077402
                15324277
                1fb16c64-8810-405b-a277-85fe7545ae08
                © 2004

                http://link.aps.org/licenses/aps-default-license

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