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      Termites amplify the effects of wood traits on decomposition rates among multiple bamboo and dicot woody species

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          Most cited references 53

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          Ecology of Coarse Woody Debris in Temperate Ecosystems

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            Towards a worldwide wood economics spectrum.

            Wood performs several essential functions in plants, including mechanically supporting aboveground tissue, storing water and other resources, and transporting sap. Woody tissues are likely to face physiological, structural and defensive trade-offs. How a plant optimizes among these competing functions can have major ecological implications, which have been under-appreciated by ecologists compared to the focus they have given to leaf function. To draw together our current understanding of wood function, we identify and collate data on the major wood functional traits, including the largest wood density database to date (8412 taxa), mechanical strength measures and anatomical features, as well as clade-specific features such as secondary chemistry. We then show how wood traits are related to one another, highlighting functional trade-offs, and to ecological and demographic plant features (growth form, growth rate, latitude, ecological setting). We suggest that, similar to the manifold that tree species leaf traits cluster around the 'leaf economics spectrum', a similar 'wood economics spectrum' may be defined. We then discuss the biogeography, evolution and biogeochemistry of the spectrum, and conclude by pointing out the major gaps in our current knowledge of wood functional traits.
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              Carbon pools and flux of global forest ecosystems.

              Forest systems cover more than 4.1 x 10(9) hectares of the Earth's land area. Globally, forest vegetation and soils contain about 1146 petagrams of carbon, with approximately 37 percent of this carbon in low-latitude forests, 14 percent in mid-latitudes, and 49 percent at high latitudes. Over two-thirds of the carbon in forest ecosystems is contained in soils and associated peat deposits. In 1990, deforestation in the low latitudes emitted 1.6 +/- 0.4 petagrams of carbon per year, whereas forest area expansion and growth in mid- and high-latitude forest sequestered 0.7 +/- 0.2 petagrams of carbon per year, for a net flux to the atmosphere of 0.9 +/- 0.4 petagrams of carbon per year. Slowing deforestation, combined with an increase in forestation and other management measures to improve forest ecosystem productivity, could conserve or sequester significant quantities of carbon. Future forest carbon cycling trends attributable to losses and regrowth associated with global climate and land-use change are uncertain. Model projections and some results suggest that forests could be carbon sinks or sources in the future.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Journal of Ecology
                J Ecol
                Wiley
                00220477
                September 2015
                September 2015
                June 03 2015
                : 103
                : 5
                : 1214-1223
                Affiliations
                [1 ]State Key Laboratory of Vegetation and Environmental Change; Institute of Botany; Chinese Academy of Sciences; Beijing 100093 China
                [2 ]Systems Ecology; Department of Ecological Science; VU University Amsterdam; De Boelelaan 1085 Amsterdam 1081 HV The Netherlands
                [3 ]School of Biological, Earth and Environmental Science; University of New South Wales; Kensington 2052 Sydney Australia
                [4 ]Key Laboratory of Tropical Forest Ecology; Xishuangbanna Tropical Botanical Garden; Chinese Academy of Sciences; Menglun Mengla Yunnan 666303 China
                [5 ]State Key Laboratory for Conservation and Utilization of Subtropical Agro-bioresources; College of Forestry; Guangxi University; Nanning Guangxi 530004 China
                [6 ]Key Laboratory of Hangzhou City for Ecosystem Protection and Restoration; College of Life and Environmental Sciences; Hangzhou Normal University; Hangzhou 310036 China
                [7 ]Graduate University of Chinese Academy of Sciences; Beijing 100049 China
                [8 ]Kunming Institute of Botany; Chinese Academy of Sciences; Kunming Yunnan 650201 China
                Article
                10.1111/1365-2745.12427
                © 2015

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