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      Gene expression profiling identifies clinically relevant subtypes of prostate cancer

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          Abstract

          Prostate cancer, a leading cause of cancer death, displays a broad range of clinical behavior from relatively indolent to aggressive metastatic disease. To explore potential molecular variation underlying this clinical heterogeneity, we profiled gene expression in 62 primary prostate tumors, as well as 41 normal prostate specimens and nine lymph node metastases, using cDNA microarrays containing approximately 26,000 genes. Unsupervised hierarchical clustering readily distinguished tumors from normal samples, and further identified three subclasses of prostate tumors based on distinct patterns of gene expression. High-grade and advanced stage tumors, as well as tumors associated with recurrence, were disproportionately represented among two of the three subtypes, one of which also included most lymph node metastases. To further characterize the clinical relevance of tumor subtypes, we evaluated as surrogate markers two genes differentially expressed among tumor subgroups by using immunohistochemistry on tissue microarrays representing an independent set of 225 prostate tumors. Positive staining for MUC1, a gene highly expressed in the subgroups with "aggressive" clinicopathological features, was associated with an elevated risk of recurrence (P = 0.003), whereas strong staining for AZGP1, a gene highly expressed in the other subgroup, was associated with a decreased risk of recurrence (P = 0.0008). In multivariate analysis, MUC1 and AZGP1 staining were strong predictors of tumor recurrence independent of tumor grade, stage, and preoperative prostate-specific antigen levels. Our results suggest that prostate tumors can be usefully classified according to their gene expression patterns, and these tumor subtypes may provide a basis for improved prognostication and treatment stratification.

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          Most cited references 24

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          In silico prediction of protein-protein interactions in human macrophages

          Background: Protein-protein interaction (PPI) network analyses are highly valuable in deciphering and understanding the intricate organisation of cellular functions. Nevertheless, the majority of available protein-protein interaction networks are context-less, i.e. without any reference to the spatial, temporal or physiological conditions in which the interactions may occur. In this work, we are proposing a protocol to infer the most likely protein-protein interaction (PPI) network in human macrophages. Results: We integrated the PPI dataset from the Agile Protein Interaction DataAnalyzer (APID) with different meta-data to infer a contextualized macrophage-specific interactome using a combination of statistical methods. The obtained interactome is enriched in experimentally verified interactions and in proteins involved in macrophage-related biological processes (i.e. immune response activation, regulation of apoptosis). As a case study, we used the contextualized interactome to highlight the cellular processes induced upon Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection. Conclusion: Our work confirms that contextualizing interactomes improves the biological significance of bioinformatic analyses. More specifically, studying such inferred network rather than focusing at the gene expression level only, is informative on the processes involved in the host response. Indeed, important immune features such as apoptosis are solely highlighted when the spotlight is on the protein interaction level.
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            Molecular Classification of Cancer: Class Discovery and Class Prediction by Gene Expression Monitoring

             T. Golub (1999)
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              Classification of human lung carcinomas by mRNA expression profiling reveals distinct adenocarcinoma subclasses.

              We have generated a molecular taxonomy of lung carcinoma, the leading cause of cancer death in the United States and worldwide. Using oligonucleotide microarrays, we analyzed mRNA expression levels corresponding to 12,600 transcript sequences in 186 lung tumor samples, including 139 adenocarcinomas resected from the lung. Hierarchical and probabilistic clustering of expression data defined distinct subclasses of lung adenocarcinoma. Among these were tumors with high relative expression of neuroendocrine genes and of type II pneumocyte genes, respectively. Retrospective analysis revealed a less favorable outcome for the adenocarcinomas with neuroendocrine gene expression. The diagnostic potential of expression profiling is emphasized by its ability to discriminate primary lung adenocarcinomas from metastases of extra-pulmonary origin. These results suggest that integration of expression profile data with clinical parameters could aid in diagnosis of lung cancer patients.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
                Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
                Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
                0027-8424
                1091-6490
                January 20 2004
                January 20 2004
                January 07 2004
                January 20 2004
                : 101
                : 3
                : 811-816
                Article
                10.1073/pnas.0304146101
                321763
                14711987
                © 2004
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