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      Chickenpox and Stroke in Childhood : A Study of Frequency and Causation

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          Perivascular meningeal projections from cat trigeminal ganglia: possible pathway for vascular headaches in man.

          Peroxidase-containing cell bodies were found in the ipsilateral trigeminal ganglia after horseradish peroxidase was applied to the proximal segment of the middle cerebral artery in seven cats. Cell bodies containing the enzyme marker were located among clusters of cells that project via the first division. The existence of sensory pathways surrounding large cerebral arteries provides an important neuroanatomical explanation for the hemicranial distribution of headaches associated with certain strokes and migraine.
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            Varicella as a risk factor for cerebral infarction in childhood: a case-control study.

            The results of this case-control study show a significant statistical link between idiopathic arterial ischemic strokes in children and varicella-zoster virus infection.
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              Herpes zoster ophthalmicus and delayed contralateral hemiparesis caused by cerebral angiitis: diagnosis and management approaches.

              Four patients with herpes zoster ophthalmicus and delayed contralateral hemiparesis are described, and their findings are compared with those in patients previously reported in the English language literature. The current patients evidenced multifocal ipsilateral cerebral angiitis by angiography and multifocal infarcts in the distribution of the ipsilateral middle cerebral artery by computed tomographic scanning. Cerebrospinal fluid showed mononuclear pleocytosis, positive oligoclonal bands, and an elevated immunoglobulin G index. Two patients were treated with corticosteroids and acyclovir, and 1 with corticosteroids alone, all without apparent response. Necrotizing angiitis ipsilateral to the herpes zoster ophthalmicus was demonstrated postmortem in 1 patient with multifocal cerebral infarction and progressive leukoencephalopathy. Neither herpes varicella zoster immunocytochemical reactivity nor viral inclusions were seen. The leukoencephalopathy associated with herpes varicella zoster either may be caused by cerebral angiitis or, as previously reported, may be a temporally remote manifestation of persistent herpes varicella zoster infection. The cerebral angiitis associated with herpes varicella zoster is histologically similar to granulomatous angiitis, and both may be related to herpes varicella zoster infection of the cerebral vasculature.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Stroke
                Stroke
                Ovid Technologies (Wolters Kluwer Health)
                0039-2499
                1524-4628
                June 2001
                June 2001
                : 32
                : 6
                : 1257-1262
                Affiliations
                [1 ]From the Hospital for Sick Children and the University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada (R.A., S.L., S.M., A.C., D.M., M.A., R.C., G.deV.), and the Children’s Hospital at HHSC, Hamilton, Canada (B.M., G.deV.).
                Article
                10.1161/01.STR.32.6.1257
                202544cb-caad-4f0b-a007-834ceb0aa2bb
                © 2001
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