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      Paget’s disease of bone: an osteoimmunological disorder?

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          Abstract

          Osteoimmunology represents a large area of research resulting from the cross talk between bone and immune systems. Many cytokines and signaling cascades are involved in the field of osteoimmunology, originating from various cell types. The RANK/receptor activator of nuclear factor Kappa-B ligand (RANKL)/osteoprotegerin (OPG) signaling has a pivotal role in osteoimmunology, in addition to proinflammatory cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin (IL)-1, IL-6, and IL-17. Clinically, osteoimmunological disorders, such as rheumatoid arthritis, osteoporosis, and periodontitis, should be classified according to their pattern of osteoimmunological serum biomarkers. Paget’s disease of bone is a common metabolic bone disorder, resulting from an excessively increased bone resorption coupled with aberrant bone formation. With the exception of the cellular responses to measles virus nucleocapsid protein and the interferon-gamma signature, the exact role of the immune system in Paget’s disease of bone is not well understood. The cytokine profiles, such as the increased levels of IL-6 and the interferon-gamma signature observed in this disease, are also very similar to those observed in other osteoimmunological disorders. As a potential osteoimmunological disorder, the treatment of Paget’s disease of bone may also benefit from progress made in targeted therapies, in particular for receptor activator of nuclear factor Kappa-B ligand and IL-6 signaling inhibition.

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          Most cited references 122

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          Activated T cells regulate bone loss and joint destruction in adjuvant arthritis through osteoprotegerin ligand.

          Bone remodelling and bone loss are controlled by a balance between the tumour necrosis factor family molecule osteoprotegerin ligand (OPGL) and its decoy receptor osteoprotegerin (OPG). In addition, OPGL regulates lymph node organogenesis, lymphocyte development and interactions between T cells and dendritic cells in the immune system. The OPGL receptor, RANK, is expressed on chondrocytes, osteoclast precursors and mature osteoclasts. OPGL expression in T cells is induced by antigen receptor engagement, which suggests that activated T cells may influence bone metabolism through OPGL and RANK. Here we report that activated T cells can directly trigger osteoclastogenesis through OPGL. Systemic activation of T cells in vivo leads to an OPGL-mediated increase in osteoclastogenesis and bone loss. In a T-cell-dependent model of rat adjuvant arthritis characterized by severe joint inflammation, bone and cartilage destruction and crippling, blocking of OPGL through osteoprotegerin treatment at the onset of disease prevents bone and cartilage destruction but not inflammation. These results show that both systemic and local T-cell activation can lead to OPGL production and subsequent bone loss, and they provide a novel paradigm for T cells as regulators of bone physiology.
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            Adult-onset primary open-angle glaucoma caused by mutations in optineurin.

            Primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG) affects 33 million individuals worldwide and is a leading cause of blindness. In a study of 54 families with autosomal dominantly inherited adult-onset POAG, we identified the causative gene on chromosome 10p14 and designated it OPTN (for "optineurin"). Sequence alterations in OPTN were found in 16.7% of families with hereditary POAG, including individuals with normal intraocular pressure. The OPTN gene codes for a conserved 66-kilodalton protein of unknown function that has been implicated in the tumor necrosis factor-alpha signaling pathway and that interacts with diverse proteins including Huntingtin, Ras-associated protein RAB8, and transcription factor IIIA. Optineurin is expressed in trabecular meshwork, nonpigmented ciliary epithelium, retina, and brain, and we speculate that it plays a neuroprotective role.
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              No place like home: anatomy and function of the stem cell niche.

              Stem cells are rare cells that are uniquely capable of both reproducing themselves (self-renewing) and generating the differentiated cell types that are needed to carry out specialized functions in the body. Stem cell behaviour, in particular the balance between self-renewal and differentiation, is ultimately controlled by the integration of intrinsic factors with extrinsic cues supplied by the surrounding microenvironment, known as the stem cell niche. The identification and characterization of niches within tissues has revealed an intriguing conservation of many components, although the mechanisms that regulate how niches are established, maintained and modified to support specific tissue stem cell functions are just beginning to be uncovered.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Drug Des Devel Ther
                Drug Des Devel Ther
                Drug Design, Development and Therapy
                Drug Design, Development and Therapy
                Dove Medical Press
                1177-8881
                2015
                14 August 2015
                : 9
                : 4695-4707
                Affiliations
                [1 ]CHU de Québec Research Centre, CHU de Québec-Université Laval, Quebec City, QC, Canada
                [2 ]Division of Rheumatology, Department of Medicine, CHU de Québec-Université Laval, Quebec City, QC, Canada
                [3 ]Department of Rheumatology, CHU de Québec-Université Laval, Quebec City, QC, Canada
                Author notes
                Correspondence: Laëtitia Michou, Rhumatologie-R4774, CHU de Québec-Université Laval, 2705 Boulevard Laurier, Québec, QC, Canada G1V 4G2, Tel +1 418 654 2178, Fax +1 418 654 2142, Email laetitia.michou@ 123456crchudequebec.ulaval.ca
                Article
                dddt-9-4695
                10.2147/DDDT.S88845
                4544727
                © 2015 Numan et al. This work is published by Dove Medical Press Limited, and licensed under Creative Commons Attribution – Non Commercial (unported, v3.0) License

                The full terms of the License are available at http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/. Non-commercial uses of the work are permitted without any further permission from Dove Medical Press Limited, provided the work is properly attributed.

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