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      An endophytic microbe from an unusual volcanic swamp corn seeks and inhabits root hair cells to extract rock phosphate

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          Abstract

          In the animal microbiome, localization of microbes to specific cell types is well established, but there are few such examples within the plant microbiome which includes endophytes. Endophytes are non-pathogenic microbes that inhabit plants. Root hairs are single cells, equivalent to the nutrient-absorbing intestinal microvilli of animals, used by plants to increase the root surface area for nutrient extraction from soil including phosphorus (P). There has been significant interest in the microbiome of intestinal microvilli but less is known about the root hair microbiome. Here we describe a bacterial endophyte (3F11) from Zea nicaraguensis, a wild corn discovered in a Nicaraguan swamp above rock-P lava flowing from the San Cristobal volcano. Rock-P is insoluble and a major challenge for plants. Following seed coating and germination on insoluble-P, the endophyte colonized epidermal surfaces, ultimately colonizing root hairs intracellularly. The endophyte promoted root hair growth and secreted acids to solubilize rock-P for uptake by a larger root hair surface. The most interesting observation was that a seed-coated endophyte targeted and colonized a critical cell type, root hair cells, consistent with earlier studies. The endophyte maintained its targeting ability in two evolutionary divergent hosts, suggesting that the host recognition machinery is conserved.

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          Most cited references 71

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          MUSCLE: multiple sequence alignment with high accuracy and high throughput.

           Robert Edgar (2004)
          We describe MUSCLE, a new computer program for creating multiple alignments of protein sequences. Elements of the algorithm include fast distance estimation using kmer counting, progressive alignment using a new profile function we call the log-expectation score, and refinement using tree-dependent restricted partitioning. The speed and accuracy of MUSCLE are compared with T-Coffee, MAFFT and CLUSTALW on four test sets of reference alignments: BAliBASE, SABmark, SMART and a new benchmark, PREFAB. MUSCLE achieves the highest, or joint highest, rank in accuracy on each of these sets. Without refinement, MUSCLE achieves average accuracy statistically indistinguishable from T-Coffee and MAFFT, and is the fastest of the tested methods for large numbers of sequences, aligning 5000 sequences of average length 350 in 7 min on a current desktop computer. The MUSCLE program, source code and PREFAB test data are freely available at http://www.drive5. com/muscle.
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            Selection of conserved blocks from multiple alignments for their use in phylogenetic analysis.

             J Castresana (2000)
            The use of some multiple-sequence alignments in phylogenetic analysis, particularly those that are not very well conserved, requires the elimination of poorly aligned positions and divergent regions, since they may not be homologous or may have been saturated by multiple substitutions. A computerized method that eliminates such positions and at the same time tries to minimize the loss of informative sites is presented here. The method is based on the selection of blocks of positions that fulfill a simple set of requirements with respect to the number of contiguous conserved positions, lack of gaps, and high conservation of flanking positions, making the final alignment more suitable for phylogenetic analysis. To illustrate the efficiency of this method, alignments of 10 mitochondrial proteins from several completely sequenced mitochondrial genomes belonging to diverse eukaryotes were used as examples. The percentages of removed positions were higher in the most divergent alignments. After removing divergent segments, the amino acid composition of the different sequences was more uniform, and pairwise distances became much smaller. Phylogenetic trees show that topologies can be different after removing conserved blocks, particularly when there are several poorly resolved nodes. Strong support was found for the grouping of animals and fungi but not for the position of more basal eukaryotes. The use of a computerized method such as the one presented here reduces to a certain extent the necessity of manually editing multiple alignments, makes the automation of phylogenetic analysis of large data sets feasible, and facilitates the reproduction of the final alignment by other researchers.
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              Phylogeny.fr: robust phylogenetic analysis for the non-specialist

              Phylogenetic analyses are central to many research areas in biology and typically involve the identification of homologous sequences, their multiple alignment, the phylogenetic reconstruction and the graphical representation of the inferred tree. The Phylogeny.fr platform transparently chains programs to automatically perform these tasks. It is primarily designed for biologists with no experience in phylogeny, but can also meet the needs of specialists; the first ones will find up-to-date tools chained in a phylogeny pipeline to analyze their data in a simple and robust way, while the specialists will be able to easily build and run sophisticated analyses. Phylogeny.fr offers three main modes. The ‘One Click’ mode targets non-specialists and provides a ready-to-use pipeline chaining programs with recognized accuracy and speed: MUSCLE for multiple alignment, PhyML for tree building, and TreeDyn for tree rendering. All parameters are set up to suit most studies, and users only have to provide their input sequences to obtain a ready-to-print tree. The ‘Advanced’ mode uses the same pipeline but allows the parameters of each program to be customized by users. The ‘A la Carte’ mode offers more flexibility and sophistication, as users can build their own pipeline by selecting and setting up the required steps from a large choice of tools to suit their specific needs. Prior to phylogenetic analysis, users can also collect neighbors of a query sequence by running BLAST on general or specialized databases. A guide tree then helps to select neighbor sequences to be used as input for the phylogeny pipeline. Phylogeny.fr is available at: http://www.phylogeny.fr/
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                Author and article information

                Contributors
                raizada@uoguelph.ca
                Journal
                Sci Rep
                Sci Rep
                Scientific Reports
                Nature Publishing Group UK (London )
                2045-2322
                18 October 2017
                18 October 2017
                2017
                : 7
                Affiliations
                [1 ]ISNI 0000 0004 1936 8198, GRID grid.34429.38, Department of Plant Agriculture, University of Guelph, ; Guelph, ON N1G 2W1 Canada
                [2 ]ISNI 0000000103426662, GRID grid.10251.37, Department of Microbiology, School of Pharmacy, Mansoura University, ; Mansoura, Egypt
                Article
                14080
                10.1038/s41598-017-14080-x
                5647395
                29044186
                © The Author(s) 2017

                Open Access This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article’s Creative Commons license, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If material is not included in the article’s Creative Commons license and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/.

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