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      Stanniocalcin stimulates phosphate reabsorption by flounder renal proximal tubule in primary culture.

      1 , ,

      The American journal of physiology

      American Physiological Society

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          Abstract

          The effects of several hormones on transepithelial Pi transport were determined in primary monolayer cultures of winter flounder proximal tubule epithelium in Ussing chambers. Salmon stanniocalcin (STC) had a dose-dependent stimulatory effect on net Pi reabsorption within the normal plasma hormone concentration range, 12.5-50 ng/ml (0.25-1.0 nM). Net Pi transport was significantly altered by STC (200 ng/ml) within 30 min and progressively increased from slight net secretion (0.26 +/- 0.744 nmol.cm-2.h-1) in untreated controls to net reabsorption (1.96 +/- 0.729 nmol.cm-2.h-1) after 3 h. The STC effect was mimicked by 10 microM forskolin, whereas 10 microM H-89, a highly specific protein kinase A inhibitor, significantly decreased both STC- and forskolin-induced Pi reabsorption. The release of adenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (cAMP) was increased more than twofold after a 1-h exposure to STC. This hormone had no effect on transepithelial Ca2+ transport. The results indicate that STC directly stimulates net renal Pi reabsorption by a cAMP-dependent pathway. In addition to STC, bovine parathyroid hormone (100 nM) and ovine prolactin (100 nM) significantly increased net Pi reabsorptive flux.

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          Author and article information

          Journal
          Am. J. Physiol.
          The American journal of physiology
          American Physiological Society
          0002-9513
          0002-9513
          Nov 1994
          : 267
          : 5 Pt 2
          Affiliations
          [1 ] Department of Physiology and Neurobiology, University of Connecticut, Storrs 06269-3042.
          Article
          7977865

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