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      Should Women Care Less? Intrinsic Motivation and Gender Inequality : Should Women Care Less?

      British Journal of Industrial Relations
      Wiley-Blackwell

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          Getting a Job: Is There a Motherhood Penalty?

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            Does intrinsic motivation fuel the prosocial fire? Motivational synergy in predicting persistence, performance, and productivity.

            Adam Grant (2008)
            Researchers have obtained conflicting results about the role of prosocial motivation in persistence, performance, and productivity. To resolve this discrepancy, I draw on self-determination theory, proposing that prosocial motivation is most likely to predict these outcomes when it is accompanied by intrinsic motivation. Two field studies support the hypothesis that intrinsic motivation moderates the association between prosocial motivation and persistence, performance, and productivity. In Study 1, intrinsic motivation strengthened the relationship between prosocial motivation and the overtime hour persistence of 58 firefighters. In Study 2, intrinsic motivation strengthened the relationship between prosocial motivation and the performance and productivity of 140 fundraising callers. Callers who reported high levels of both prosocial and intrinsic motivations raised more money 1 month later, and this moderated association was mediated by a larger number of calls made. I discuss implications for theory and research on work motivation. 2008 APA
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              The coevolution of parochial altruism and war.

              Altruism-benefiting fellow group members at a cost to oneself-and parochialism-hostility toward individuals not of one's own ethnic, racial, or other group-are common human behaviors. The intersection of the two-which we term "parochial altruism"-is puzzling from an evolutionary perspective because altruistic or parochial behavior reduces one's payoffs by comparison to what one would gain by eschewing these behaviors. But parochial altruism could have evolved if parochialism promoted intergroup hostilities and the combination of altruism and parochialism contributed to success in these conflicts. Our game-theoretic analysis and agent-based simulations show that under conditions likely to have been experienced by late Pleistocene and early Holocene humans, neither parochialism nor altruism would have been viable singly, but by promoting group conflict, they could have evolved jointly.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                British Journal of Industrial Relations
                British Journal of Industrial Relations
                Wiley-Blackwell
                00071080
                December 2012
                December 06 2012
                : 50
                : 4
                : 597-619
                Article
                10.1111/bjir.12000
                21246873-052b-4fa1-a8b1-e29424301a5e
                © 2012

                http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/tdm_license_1.1

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