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Interprofessional Education: An Evaluation of a Joint Learning Workshop for Podiatry and Pharmacy Students

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      Abstract

      “Interprofessional Education occurs when two or more professionals learn with, from and about each other to improve collaboration and the quality of care” (CAIPE 2002). Interprofessional education forms part of the Standards for the Initial Education and Training of Pharmacists. Working with and understanding the role of another profession has been shown to positively impact on the quality of care of the patient. Following positive pharmacy student feedback from visits to podiatry clinics an interprofessional learning workshop with case - based scenarios was developed. These were based on patients with high risk medical conditions that would impact on the work of both professions. Data from the feedback forms was evaluated and analysed to determine whether the workshop increased knowledge of the British National Formulary (BNF), the prescribing process and gave an insight in to the role of other healthcare professionals. We discuss how the student’s learning has been enhanced by the contribution of another professional group. The workshop was positively received. Students were observed working together discussing the patients’ conditions and issues relating to their care. This initially revolved around the students’ area of knowledge; however, as the session progressed it became apparent that the students were learning with, from and about each other for the benefit of patient care.

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      Stereotyping as a barrier to collaboration: Does interprofessional education make a difference?

      This research was part of a Health Canada funded initiative developed to provide evidence about the effectiveness of interprofessional education (IPE) interventions to promote collaborative patient-centred care. Health professional students' ratings of health professions and the effect of IPE on those ratings were examined. Participants were divided into three groups (N=51); control, education, and practice site immersion. Utilizing the Student Stereotypes Rating Questionnaire (SSRQ) which consists of a five point Likert-type scale each group rated health professionals on nine characteristics: academic ability, interpersonal skills, professional competence, leadership, practical skills, independence, confidence, decision-making, and being a team player (Hean, Macleod-Clark, Adams, and Humphris, 2006). Data were collected at four time points; prior to an IPE classroom intervention, following an IPE classroom intervention, following the IPE immersion experience, and four months post IPE immersion experience. Overall, perceptions of other health professions were more positive following the 2.5day interprofessional education session and immersion experience. Student ratings of the seven professions among the nine characteristics will be presented, highlighting similarities and differences across professional groups. Findings support the incorporation of IPE curricula that address the role and functions of other health care professions to facilitate the development collaborative patient-centred care health care teams. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
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        Evaluating Interprofessional Education: two systematic reviews for health and social care

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          Interprofessional Education and Practice Guide No. 1; Developing faculty to effectively facilitate interprofessional education

          With the growth of interprofessional education (IPE) and practice in health professional schools, faculty members are being asked to assume new roles in leading or delivering interprofessional curriculum. Many existing faculty members feel ill-prepared to face the challenges of this curricular innovation. From 2012–2013, University of Missouri – Columbia and University of Washington partnered with six additional academic health centers to pilot a faculty development course to prepare faculty leaders for IPE. Using a variety of techniques, including didactic teaching, small group exercises, immersion participation in interprofessional education, local implementation of new IPE projects, and peer learning, the program positioned each site to successfully introduce an interprofessional innovation. Participating faculty confirmed the value of the program, and suggested that more widespread similar efforts were worthwhile. This guide briefly describes this faculty development program and identifies key lessons learned from the initiative. Peer learning arising from a faculty development community, adaptation of curricula to fit local context, experiential learning, and ongoing coaching/mentoring, especially as it related to actual participation in IPE activities, were among the key elements of this successful faculty development activity.
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            Author and article information

            Affiliations
            Department of Pharmacy, School of Applied Sciences, University of Huddersfield, United Kingdom
            Author notes
            *Corresponding author. Tel.: +441484471331 E-mail: k.j.greenwood@123456hud.ac.uk
            Journal
            BJPharm
            British Journal of Pharmacy
            University of Huddersfield Press
            2058-8356
            14 November 2016
            : 1
            : 1
            : 115-120
            10.5920/bjpharm.2016.08
            © 2016, Katie Greenwood, Elizabeth Horncastle, John Stephenson

            This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (CC BY) 4.0 https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/.

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