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      The influence of peers on young adult substance use.

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      Health Psychology
      American Psychological Association (APA)

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          Abstract

          Data collected from 294 young adults, ages 19 to 25, and both a same- and an opposite-gender best friend or mate across 3 annual assessments were analyzed to examine the similarity to and influence of the peer on the young adult's substance use. The authors found similarity across time between both peers and the young adult in cigarette use, alcohol use, binge drinking, and, in most cases, marijuana use. In prospective analyses, peer use predicted young adult cigarette use, binge drinking, and problem use by the young adults. Results were generally consistent across gender and for both same- and opposite-gender peers. Findings emphasize peer influence contribution to young adult substance use and suggest the design of interventions that involve both young adults and their peers.

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          Most cited references26

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          Homophily, Selection, and Socialization in Adolescent Friendships

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            Longitudinal Data Analysis Using Generalized Linear Models

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              Friends' influence of adolescents' adjustment to school.

              Adolescents may be influenced both by their friends' behaviors and by the features of their friendships. To examine both types of influence, seventh and eighth graders (N = 297) were asked in the fall of a school year to report their involvement and disruption at school. The students also described the positive and negative features of their best friendships. Teachers reported on the students' involvement, disruption, and grades. These assessments were repeated in the following spring. Students whose friends in the fall described themselves as more disruptive increased in self-reported disruption during the year. Girls' self-reported disruption was more influenced by that of their very best friend than was boys'. Students whose very best friendships had more positive features increased in their self-reported involvement during the year. Students whose friendships had more negative features increased in their self-reported disruption, but only if their friendships also had many positive features. The theoretical and practical implications of these findings, and the adequacy of different methods for estimating friends' influence, were discussed.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Health Psychology
                Health Psychology
                American Psychological Association (APA)
                1930-7810
                0278-6133
                2002
                2002
                : 21
                : 4
                : 349-357
                Article
                10.1037/0278-6133.21.4.349
                12090677
                21971b68-08ac-4d56-8c63-6393227c5a67
                © 2002
                History

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