Blog
About

14
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
0 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: found
      • Article: not found

      The Rotterdam Study: 2018 update on objectives, design and main results

      , 1 , 3 , 1 , 11 , 12 , 2 , 8 , 1 , 1 , 5 , 9 , 1 , 7 , 10 , 1 , 2 , 1 , 2 , 1 , 4 , 1 , 2 , 1 , 6 , 1 , 13

      European Journal of Epidemiology

      Springer Netherlands

      Biomarkers, Cardiovascular diseases, Cohort study, Dermatological diseases, Endocrine diseases, Epidemiologic methods, Genetic epidemiology, Liver diseases, Neurological diseases, Oncology, Ophthalmic diseases, Otolaryngological diseases, Pharmacoepidemiology, Renal diseases, Psychiatric diseases, Respiratory diseases

      Read this article at

      ScienceOpenPublisherPMC
      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Abstract

          The Rotterdam Study is a prospective cohort study ongoing since 1990 in the city of Rotterdam in The Netherlands. The study targets cardiovascular, endocrine, hepatic, neurological, ophthalmic, psychiatric, dermatological, otolaryngological, locomotor, and respiratory diseases. As of 2008, 14,926 subjects aged 45 years or over comprise the Rotterdam Study cohort. Since 2016, the cohort is being expanded by persons aged 40 years and over. The findings of the Rotterdam Study have been presented in over 1500 research articles and reports (see www.erasmus-epidemiology.nl/rotterdamstudy). This article gives the rationale of the study and its design. It also presents a summary of the major findings and an update of the objectives and methods.

          Related collections

          Most cited references 484

          • Record: found
          • Abstract: found
          • Article: not found

          Genetic Variants in Novel Pathways Influence Blood Pressure and Cardiovascular Disease Risk

           Mika Kivimaki (2011)
          Blood pressure (BP) is a heritable trait 1 influenced by multiple biological pathways and is responsive to environmental stimuli. Over one billion people worldwide have hypertension (BP ≥140 mm Hg systolic [SBP] or ≥90 mm Hg diastolic [DBP]) 2 . Even small increments in BP are associated with increased risk of cardiovascular events 3 . This genome-wide association study of SBP and DBP, which used a multi-stage design in 200,000 individuals of European descent, identified 16 novel loci: six of these loci contain genes previously known or suspected to regulate BP (GUCY1A3-GUCY1B3; NPR3-C5orf23; ADM; FURIN-FES; GOSR2; GNAS-EDN3); the other 10 provide new clues to BP physiology. A genetic risk score based on 29 genome-wide significant variants was associated with hypertension, left ventricular wall thickness, stroke, and coronary artery disease, but not kidney disease or kidney function. We also observed associations with BP in East Asian, South Asian, and African ancestry individuals. Our findings provide new insights into the genetics and biology of BP, and suggest novel potential therapeutic pathways for cardiovascular disease prevention.
            Bookmark
            • Record: found
            • Abstract: found
            • Article: not found

            Large-scale association analysis identifies 13 new susceptibility loci for coronary artery disease.

            We performed a meta-analysis of 14 genome-wide association studies of coronary artery disease (CAD) comprising 22,233 individuals with CAD (cases) and 64,762 controls of European descent followed by genotyping of top association signals in 56,682 additional individuals. This analysis identified 13 loci newly associated with CAD at P < 5 × 10⁻⁸ and confirmed the association of 10 of 12 previously reported CAD loci. The 13 new loci showed risk allele frequencies ranging from 0.13 to 0.91 and were associated with a 6% to 17% increase in the risk of CAD per allele. Notably, only three of the new loci showed significant association with traditional CAD risk factors and the majority lie in gene regions not previously implicated in the pathogenesis of CAD. Finally, five of the new CAD risk loci appear to have pleiotropic effects, showing strong association with various other human diseases or traits.
              Bookmark
              • Record: found
              • Abstract: found
              • Article: not found

              Human fatty liver disease: old questions and new insights.

              Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is a burgeoning health problem that affects one-third of adults and an increasing number of children in developed countries. The disease begins with the aberrant accumulation of triglyceride in the liver, which in some individuals elicits an inflammatory response that can progress to cirrhosis and liver cancer. Although NAFLD is strongly associated with obesity and insulin resistance, its pathogenesis remains poorly understood, and therapeutic options are limited. Here, we discuss recent mechanistic insights into NAFLD, focusing primarily on those that have emerged from human genetic and metabolic studies.
                Bookmark

                Author and article information

                Affiliations
                [1 ]ISNI 000000040459992X, GRID grid.5645.2, Department of Epidemiology, , Erasmus Medical Center, ; PO Box 2040, 3000 CA Rotterdam, The Netherlands
                [2 ]ISNI 000000040459992X, GRID grid.5645.2, Department of Internal Medicine, , Erasmus Medical Center, ; Rotterdam, The Netherlands
                [3 ]ISNI 000000040459992X, GRID grid.5645.2, Department of Neurology, , Erasmus Medical Center, ; Rotterdam, The Netherlands
                [4 ]ISNI 000000040459992X, GRID grid.5645.2, Department of Psychiatry, , Erasmus Medical Center, ; Rotterdam, The Netherlands
                [5 ]ISNI 000000040459992X, GRID grid.5645.2, Department of Cardiology, , Erasmus Medical Center, ; Rotterdam, The Netherlands
                [6 ]ISNI 000000040459992X, GRID grid.5645.2, Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, , Erasmus Medical Center, ; Rotterdam, The Netherlands
                [7 ]ISNI 000000040459992X, GRID grid.5645.2, Department of Ophthalmology, , Erasmus Medical Center, ; Rotterdam, The Netherlands
                [8 ]ISNI 000000040459992X, GRID grid.5645.2, Department of Gastro-Enterology, , Erasmus Medical Center, ; Rotterdam, The Netherlands
                [9 ]ISNI 000000040459992X, GRID grid.5645.2, Department of Otolaryngology, , Erasmus Medical Center, ; Rotterdam, The Netherlands
                [10 ]ISNI 000000040459992X, GRID grid.5645.2, Department of Dermatology, , Erasmus Medical Center, ; Rotterdam, The Netherlands
                [11 ]ISNI 000000040459992X, GRID grid.5645.2, Department of Respiratory Medicine, , Erasmus Medical Center, ; Rotterdam, The Netherlands
                [12 ]ISNI 0000 0004 0626 3303, GRID grid.410566.0, Department of Respiratory Medicine, , Ghent University Hospital, ; Ghent, Belgium
                [13 ]ISNI 000000041936754X, GRID grid.38142.3c, Department of Epidemiology, , Harvard T. H. Chan School of Public Health, ; Boston, MA USA
                Contributors
                m.a.ikram@erasmusmc.nl
                Journal
                Eur J Epidemiol
                Eur. J. Epidemiol
                European Journal of Epidemiology
                Springer Netherlands (Dordrecht )
                0393-2990
                1573-7284
                24 October 2017
                24 October 2017
                2017
                : 32
                : 9
                : 807-850
                29064009 5662692 321 10.1007/s10654-017-0321-4
                © Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2017
                Categories
                Study Update
                Custom metadata
                © Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2017

                Comments

                Comment on this article