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      Bile acids: Chemistry, physiology, and pathophysiology

      , , ,
      World Journal of Gastroenterology
      Baishideng Publishing Group Inc.

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          Identification of a nuclear receptor for bile acids.

          Bile acids are essential for the solubilization and transport of dietary lipids and are the major products of cholesterol catabolism. Results presented here show that bile acids are physiological ligands for the farnesoid X receptor (FXR), an orphan nuclear receptor. When bound to bile acids, FXR repressed transcription of the gene encoding cholesterol 7alpha-hydroxylase, which is the rate-limiting enzyme in bile acid synthesis, and activated the gene encoding intestinal bile acid-binding protein, which is a candidate bile acid transporter. These results demonstrate a mechanism by which bile acids transcriptionally regulate their biosynthesis and enterohepatic transport.
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            A regulatory cascade of the nuclear receptors FXR, SHP-1, and LRH-1 represses bile acid biosynthesis.

            Bile acids repress the transcription of cytochrome P450 7A1 (CYP7A1), which catalyzes the rate-limiting step in bile acid biosynthesis. Although bile acids activate the farnesoid X receptor (FXR), the mechanism underlying bile acid-mediated repression of CYP7A1 remained unclear. We have used a potent, nonsteroidal FXR ligand to show that FXR induces expression of small heterodimer partner 1 (SHP-1), an atypical member of the nuclear receptor family that lacks a DNA-binding domain. SHP-1 represses expression of CYP7A1 by inhibiting the activity of liver receptor homolog 1 (LRH-1), an orphan nuclear receptor that is known to regulate CYP7A1 expression positively. This bile acid-activated regulatory cascade provides a molecular basis for the coordinate suppression of CYP7A1 and other genes involved in bile acid biosynthesis.
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              Endogenous bile acids are ligands for the nuclear receptor FXR/BAR.

              The major metabolic pathway for elimination of cholesterol is via conversion to bile acids. In addition to this metabolic function, bile acids also act as signaling molecules that negatively regulate their own biosynthesis. However, the precise nature of this signaling pathway has been elusive. We have isolated an endogenous biliary component (chenodeoxycholic acid) that selectively activates the orphan nuclear receptor, FXR. Structure-activity analysis defined a subset of related bile acid ligands that activate FXR and promote coactivator recruitment. Finally, we show that ligand-occupied FXR inhibits transactivation from the oxysterol receptor LXR alpha, a positive regulator of cholesterol degradation. We suggest that FXR (BAR) is the endogenous bile acid sensor and thus an important regulator of cholesterol homeostasis.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                applab
                World Journal of Gastroenterology
                WJG
                Baishideng Publishing Group Inc.
                1007-9327
                2009
                2009
                : 15
                : 7
                : 804
                Article
                10.3748/wjg.15.804
                19230041
                21bc757b-91f7-4a9b-963f-1391acb35e79
                © 2009
                History

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