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      Home Use of a Neural-connected Sensory Prosthesis Provides the Functional and Psychosocial Experience of Having a Hand Again

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          Abstract

          The loss of a hand has many psychosocial repercussions. While advanced multi-articulated prostheses can improve function, without sensation, they cannot restore the full experience and connection of a hand. Direct nerve interfaces can restore naturalistic sensation to amputees. Our sensory restoration system produced tactile and proprioceptive sensations on the hand via neural stimulation through chronically implanted electrodes. In this study, upper limb amputees used a sensory-enabled prosthesis in their homes and communities, autonomously and unconstrained to specific tasks. These real-life conditions enabled us to study the impact of sensation on prosthetic usage, functional performance, and psychosocial experience. We found that sensory feedback fundamentally altered the way participants used their prosthesis, transforming it from a sporadically-used tool into a readily and frequently-used hand. Functional performance with sensation improved following extended daily use. Restored sensation improved a wide range of psychosocial factors, including self-efficacy, prosthetic embodiment, self-image, social interaction, and quality of life. This study demonstrates that daily use of a sensory-enabled prosthesis restores the holistic experience of having a hand and more fully reconnects amputees with the world.

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          Most cited references 50

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          Biomechanics and Motor Control of Human Movement

           David Winter (2009)
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            The prevalence and distribution of major depression in a national community sample: the National Comorbidity Survey.

            Major depression is a frequent and disabling psychiatric disorder in the United States. This report examines the prevalence and risk factor profile of both pure and comorbid major depression according to data from the National Comorbidity Survey. To estimate the prevalence of psychiatric comorbidity in the United States, a national sample of 8,098 persons 15-54 years of age from the 48 conterminous states was surveyed with a modified version of the Composite International Diagnostic Interview. From the survey data the prevalence of current (30-day) major depression was estimated to be 4.9%, with a relatively higher prevalence in females, young adults, and persons with less than a college education. The prevalence estimate for lifetime major depression was 17.1%, with a similar demographic distribution. Both 30-day and lifetime prevalence estimates were higher than estimates from the earlier Epidemiologic Catchment Area study. When pure major depression was compared with major depression co-occurring with other psychiatric disorders, the risk factor profiles exhibited clear differences. These findings suggest a greater burden of major depression in community-dwelling persons than has been estimated from previous community samples. The risk factor profile showed significant differences between persons with pure and combined major depression.
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              Restoring natural sensory feedback in real-time bidirectional hand prostheses.

              Hand loss is a highly disabling event that markedly affects the quality of life. To achieve a close to natural replacement for the lost hand, the user should be provided with the rich sensations that we naturally perceive when grasping or manipulating an object. Ideal bidirectional hand prostheses should involve both a reliable decoding of the user's intentions and the delivery of nearly "natural" sensory feedback through remnant afferent pathways, simultaneously and in real time. However, current hand prostheses fail to achieve these requirements, particularly because they lack any sensory feedback. We show that by stimulating the median and ulnar nerve fascicles using transversal multichannel intrafascicular electrodes, according to the information provided by the artificial sensors from a hand prosthesis, physiologically appropriate (near-natural) sensory information can be provided to an amputee during the real-time decoding of different grasping tasks to control a dexterous hand prosthesis. This feedback enabled the participant to effectively modulate the grasping force of the prosthesis with no visual or auditory feedback. Three different force levels were distinguished and consistently used by the subject. The results also demonstrate that a high complexity of perception can be obtained, allowing the subject to identify the stiffness and shape of three different objects by exploiting different characteristics of the elicited sensations. This approach could improve the efficacy and "life-like" quality of hand prostheses, resulting in a keystone strategy for the near-natural replacement of missing hands.
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                Author and article information

                Contributors
                dustin.tyler@case.edu
                Journal
                Sci Rep
                Sci Rep
                Scientific Reports
                Nature Publishing Group UK (London )
                2045-2322
                29 June 2018
                29 June 2018
                2018
                : 8
                Affiliations
                [1 ]ISNI 0000 0001 2164 3847, GRID grid.67105.35, Department of Biomedical Engineering, , Case Western Reserve University, ; Cleveland, OH USA
                [2 ]ISNI 0000 0004 0420 4094, GRID grid.413904.b, Providence Veterans Affairs Medical Center, ; Providence, RI USA
                [3 ]ISNI 0000 0004 1936 9094, GRID grid.40263.33, Health Services, Policy and Practice, , Brown University, ; Providence, RI USA
                [4 ]ISNI 0000 0004 0420 190X, GRID grid.410349.b, Louis Stokes Cleveland Veterans Affairs Medical Center, ; Cleveland, OH USA
                Article
                26952
                10.1038/s41598-018-26952-x
                6026118
                29959334
                © The Author(s) 2018

                Open Access This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article’s Creative Commons license, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If material is not included in the article’s Creative Commons license and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/.

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