8
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
0 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: not found
      • Article: not found

      Systemic lupus erythematosus

      , ,

      The Lancet

      Elsevier BV

      Read this article at

      ScienceOpenPublisherPubMed
      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Abstract

          Systemic lupus erythematosus is an autoimmune connective-tissue disorder with a wide range of clinical features, which predominantly affects women, especially from certain ethnic groups. Diagnosis is based on clinical assessment supported by investigations, including the finding of autoantibodies. Treatments range from antimalarial agents to corticosteroids and immunosuppressive agents. This Seminar draws attention to advances in the epidemiology, genetics, cardiovascular risks, lupus nephritis, CNS disease, the antiphospholipid syndrome, assessment of disease activity and damage, and pregnancy related and quality of life issues. New therapeutic approaches, such as biological agents and mycophenolate mofetil, will also be discussed.

          Related collections

          Most cited references 92

          • Record: found
          • Abstract: found
          • Article: not found

          Antiphospholipid syndrome: clinical and immunologic manifestations and patterns of disease expression in a cohort of 1,000 patients.

          To analyze the clinical and immunologic manifestations of antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) in a large cohort of patients and to define patterns of disease expression. The clinical and serologic features of APS (Sapporo preliminary criteria) in 1,000 patients from 13 European countries were analyzed using a computerized database. The cohort consisted of 820 female patients (82.0%) and 180 male patients (18.0%) with a mean +/- SD age of 42 +/- 14 years at study entry. "Primary" APS was present in 53.1% of the patients; APS was associated with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) in 36.2%, with lupus-like syndrome in 5.0%, and with other diseases in 5.9%. A variety of thrombotic manifestations affecting the majority of organs were recorded. A catastrophic APS occurred in 0.8% of the patients. Patients with APS associated with SLE had more episodes of arthritis and livedo reticularis, and more frequently exhibited thrombocytopenia and leukopenia. Female patients had a higher frequency of arthritis, livedo reticularis, and migraine. Male patients had a higher frequency of myocardial infarction, epilepsy, and arterial thrombosis in the lower legs and feet. In 28 patients (2.8%), disease onset occurred before age 15; these patients had more episodes of chorea and jugular vein thrombosis than the remaining patients. In 127 patients (12.7%), disease onset occurred after age 50; most of these patients were men. These patients had a higher frequency of stroke and angina pectoris, but a lower frequency of livedo reticularis, than the remaining patients. APS may affect any organ of the body and display a broad spectrum of manifestations. An association with SLE, the patient's sex, and the patient's age at disease onset can modify the disease expression and define specific subsets of APS.
            Bookmark
            • Record: found
            • Abstract: found
            • Article: not found

            International consensus statement on an update of the classification criteria for definite antiphospholipid syndrome (APS).

            New clinical, laboratory and experimental insights, since the 1999 publication of the Sapporo preliminary classification criteria for antiphospholipid syndrome (APS), had been addressed at a workshop in Sydney, Australia, before the Eleventh International Congress on antiphospholipid antibodies. In this document, we appraise the existing evidence on clinical and laboratory features of APS addressed during the forum. Based on this, we propose amendments to the Sapporo criteria. We also provide definitions on features of APS that were not included in the updated criteria.
              Bookmark
              • Record: found
              • Abstract: found
              • Article: not found

              Prevalence and correlates of accelerated atherosclerosis in systemic lupus erythematosus.

              Although systemic lupus erythematosus is associated with premature myocardial infarction, the prevalence of underlying atherosclerosis and its relation to traditional risk factors for cardiovascular disease and lupus-related factors have not been examined in a case-control study. In 197 patients with lupus and 197 matched controls, we performed carotid ultrasonography, echocardiography, and an assessment for risk factors for cardiovascular disease. The patients were also evaluated with respect to their clinical and serologic features, inflammatory mediators, and disease treatment. The risk factors for cardiovascular disease were similar among patients and controls. Atherosclerosis (carotid plaque) was more prevalent among patients than the controls (37.1 percent vs. 15.2 percent, P<0.001). In multivariate analysis, only older age, the presence of systemic lupus erythematosus (odds ratio, 4.8; 95 percent confidence interval, 2.6 to 8.7), and a higher serum cholesterol level were independently related to the presence of plaque. As compared with patients without plaque, patients with plaque were older, had a longer duration of disease and more disease-related damage, and were less likely to have multiple autoantibodies or to have been treated with prednisone, cyclophosphamide, or hydroxychloroquine. In multivariate analyses including patients with lupus, independent predictors of plaque were a longer duration of disease, a higher damage-index score, a lower incidence of the use of cyclophosphamide, and the absence of anti-Smith antibodies. Atherosclerosis occurs prematurely in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus and is independent of traditional risk factors for cardiovascular disease. The clinical profile of patients with lupus and atherosclerosis suggests a role for disease-related factors in atherogenesis and underscores the need for trials of more focused and effective antiinflammatory therapy. Copyright 2003 Massachusetts Medical Society
                Bookmark

                Author and article information

                Journal
                The Lancet
                The Lancet
                Elsevier BV
                01406736
                February 2007
                February 2007
                : 369
                : 9561
                : 587-596
                Article
                10.1016/S0140-6736(07)60279-7
                17307106
                © 2007

                Comments

                Comment on this article