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Nerolidol: A Sesquiterpene Alcohol with Multi-Faceted Pharmacological and Biological Activities

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      Abstract

      Nerolidol (3,7,11-trimethyl-1,6,10-dodecatrien-3-ol) is a naturally occurring sesquiterpene alcohol that is present in various plants with a floral odor. It is synthesized as an intermediate in the production of (3E)-4,8-dimethy-1,3,7-nonatriene (DMNT), a herbivore-induced volatile that protects plants from herbivore damage. Chemically, nerolidol exists in two geometric isomers, a trans and a cis form. The usage of nerolidol is widespread across different industries. It has been widely used in cosmetics (e.g., shampoos and perfumes) and in non-cosmetic products (e.g., detergents and cleansers). In fact, U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has also permitted the use of nerolidol as a food flavoring agent. The fact that nerolidol is a common ingredient in many products has attracted researchers to explore more medicinal properties of nerolidol that may exert beneficial effect on human health. Therefore, the aim of this review is to compile and consolidate the data on the various pharmacological and biological activities displayed by nerolidol. Furthermore, this review also includes pharmacokinetic and toxicological studies of nerolidol. In summary, the various pharmacological and biological activities demonstrated in this review highlight the prospects of nerolidol as a promising chemical or drug candidate in the field of agriculture and medicine.

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            Author and article information

            Affiliations
            [1 ]School of Pharmacy, Monash University Malaysia, 47500 Bandar Sunway, Selangor Darul Ehsan, Malaysia; wkcha29@ 123456student.monash.edu (W.-K.C.); lttan13@ 123456student.monash.edu (L.T.-H.T.)
            [2 ]Biomedical Research Laboratory, Jeffrey Cheah School of Medicine and Health Sciences, Monash University Malaysia, 47500 Bandar Sunway, Selangor Darul Ehsan, Malaysia
            [3 ]Division of Genetics and Molecular Biology, Institute of Biological Sciences, Faculty of Science, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia; kokgan@ 123456um.edu.my
            [4 ]Center of Health Outcomes Research and Therapeutic Safety (Cohorts), School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Phayao, 56000 Phayao, Thailand
            Author notes
            [* ]Correspondence: lee.learn.han@ 123456monash.edu or leelearnhan@ 123456yahoo.com (L.-H.L.); goh.bey.hing@ 123456monash.edu (B.-H.G.); Tel.: +60-3-5514-5887 or +60-3-5514-4887 (L.-H.L. & B.-H.G.); Fax: +60-3-5514-6364 (L.-H.L. & B.-H.G.)
            Contributors
            Role: Academic Editor
            Journal
            Molecules
            Molecules
            molecules
            Molecules
            MDPI
            1420-3049
            28 April 2016
            May 2016
            : 21
            : 5
            27136520
            6272852
            10.3390/molecules21050529
            molecules-21-00529
            (Academic Editor)
            © 2016 by the authors.

            Licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland. This article is an open access article distributed under the terms and conditions of the Creative Commons Attribution (CC-BY) license ( http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/).

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