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      Paroxysmal nocturnal haemoglobinuria.

      Nature reviews. Disease primers

      Springer Nature

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          Abstract

          Paroxysmal nocturnal haemoglobinuria (PNH) is a clonal haematopoietic stem cell (HSC) disease that presents with haemolytic anaemia, thrombosis and smooth muscle dystonias, as well as bone marrow failure in some cases. PNH is caused by somatic mutations in PIGA (which encodes phosphatidylinositol N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase subunit A) in one or more HSC clones. The gene product of PIGA is required for the biosynthesis of glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) anchors; thus, PIGA mutations lead to a deficiency of GPI-anchored proteins, such as complement decay-accelerating factor (also known as CD55) and CD59 glycoprotein (CD59), which are both complement inhibitors. Clinical manifestations of PNH occur when a HSC clone carrying somatic PIGA mutations acquires a growth advantage and differentiates, generating mature blood cells that are deficient of GPI-anchored proteins. The loss of CD55 and CD59 renders PNH erythrocytes susceptible to intravascular haemolysis, which can lead to thrombosis and to much of the morbidity and mortality of PNH. The accumulation of anaphylatoxins (such as C5a) from complement activation might also have a role. The natural history of PNH is highly variable, ranging from quiescent to life-threatening. Therapeutic strategies include terminal complement blockade and bone marrow transplantation. Eculizumab, a monoclonal antibody complement inhibitor, is highly effective and the only licensed therapy for PNH.

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          Most cited references 109

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          The clinical sequelae of intravascular hemolysis and extracellular plasma hemoglobin: a novel mechanism of human disease.

          The efficient sequestration of hemoglobin by the red blood cell membrane and the presence of multiple hemoglobin clearance mechanisms suggest a critical need to prevent the buildup of this molecule in the plasma. A growing list of clinical manifestations attributed to hemoglobin release in a variety of acquired and iatrogenic hemolytic disorders suggests that hemolysis and hemoglobinemia should be considered as a novel mechanism of human disease. Pertinent scientific literature databases and references were searched through October 2004 using terms that encompassed various aspects of hemolysis, hemoglobin preparations, clinical symptoms associated with plasma hemoglobin, nitric oxide in hemolysis, anemia, pulmonary hypertension, paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria, and sickle-cell disease. Hemoglobin is released into the plasma from the erythrocyte during intravascular hemolysis in hereditary, acquired, and iatrogenic hemolytic conditions. When the capacity of protective hemoglobin-scavenging mechanisms has been saturated, levels of cell-free hemoglobin increase in the plasma, resulting in the consumption of nitric oxide and clinical sequelae. Nitric oxide plays a major role in vascular homeostasis and has been shown to be a critical regulator of basal and stress-mediated smooth muscle relaxation and vasomotor tone, endothelial adhesion molecule expression, and platelet activation and aggregation. Thus, clinical consequences of excessive cell-free plasma hemoglobin levels during intravascular hemolysis or the administration of hemoglobin preparations include dystonias involving the gastrointestinal, cardiovascular, pulmonary, and urogenital systems, as well as clotting disorders. Many of the clinical sequelae of intravascular hemolysis in a prototypic hemolytic disease, paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria, are readily explained by hemoglobin-mediated nitric oxide scavenging. A growing body of evidence supports the existence of a novel mechanism of human disease, namely, hemolysis-associated smooth muscle dystonia, vasculopathy, and endothelial dysfunction.
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            Roles of HMGA proteins in cancer.

            The high mobility group A (HMGA) non-histone chromatin proteins alter chromatin structure and thereby regulate the transcription of several genes by either enhancing or suppressing transcription factors. This protein family is implicated, through different mechanisms, in both benign and malignant neoplasias. Rearrangements of HMGA genes are a feature of most benign human mesenchymal tumours. Conversely, unrearranged HMGA overexpression is a feature of malignant tumours and is also causally related to neoplastic cell transformation. Here, we focus on the role of the HMGA proteins in human neoplastic diseases, the mechanisms by which they contribute to carcinogenesis, and therapeutic strategies based on targeting HMGA proteins.
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              Current concepts in the pathophysiology and treatment of aplastic anemia.

              Aplastic anemia, an unusual hematologic disease, is the paradigm of the human bone marrow failure syndromes. Almost universally fatal just a few decades ago, aplastic anemia can now be cured or ameliorated by stem-cell transplantation or immunosuppressive drug therapy. The pathophysiology is immune mediated in most cases, with activated type 1 cytotoxic T cells implicated. The molecular basis of the aberrant immune response and deficiencies in hematopoietic cells is now being defined genetically; examples are telomere repair gene mutations in the target cells and dysregulated T-cell activation pathways. Immunosuppression with antithymocyte globulins and cyclosporine is effective at restoring blood-cell production in the majority of patients, but relapse and especially evolution of clonal hematologic diseases remain problematic. Allogeneic stem-cell transplant from histocompatible sibling donors is curative in the great majority of young patients with severe aplastic anemia; the major challenges are extending the benefits of transplantation to patients who are older or who lack family donors. Recent results with alternative sources of stem cells and a variety of conditioning regimens to achieve their engraftment have been promising, with survival in small pediatric case series rivaling conventional transplantation results.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                28516949
                10.1038/nrdp.2017.28
                7879566

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