Blog
About

30
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
1 collections
    1
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: found
      • Article: found
      Is Open Access

      ENERGY EMBODIED IN, AND TRANSMITTED THROUGH, WALLS OF DIFFERENT TYPES WHEN ACCOUNTING FOR THE DYNAMIC EFFECTS OF THERMAL MASS

      Read this article at

      ScienceOpenPublisher
      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          ABSTRACT

          Embodied energy is a measure of the energy used in producing, transporting and assembling the materials for a building. Operational energy is the energy used to moderate the indoor environment to make it functional or comfortable—primarily, to heat or cool the building. For many building geometries, the walls make the most significant contribution to the embodied energy of the building, and they are also the path of greatest heat loss or gain through the fabric, as they often have a greater surface area than the roof or floor. Adding insulation reduces the heat flow through the wall, reducing the energy used during operation, but this adds to the embodied energy. The operational energy is not only a function of the wall buildup, but also depends on the climate, occupancy pattern, and heating strategy, making an optimisation for minimum overall energy use non-trivial. This study presents a comparison of typical wall construction types and heating strategies in a temperate maritime climate. The transient energy ratio method is a means to abstract the heat flow through the walls (operational energy for heating), allowing assessment of the influence of walls in isolation (i.e. in a general sense, without being restricted to particular building geometries). Three retrofit scenarios for a solid wall are considered. At very low U-values, overall energy use can increase as the embodied energy can exceed the operational energy; current best practice walls coupled with low building lifetimes mean that this point may be reached in the near future. Substantial uncertainty is present in existing embodied energy data, and given its contribution to total energy use, this is a topic of urgent concern.

          Related collections

          Most cited references 37

          • Record: found
          • Abstract: not found
          • Article: not found

          Energy use in the life cycle of conventional and low-energy buildings: A review article

            Bookmark
            • Record: found
            • Abstract: not found
            • Article: not found

            Life cycle energy analysis of buildings: An overview

              Bookmark
              • Record: found
              • Abstract: not found
              • Article: not found

              Life cycle assessment (LCA) and life cycle energy analysis (LCEA) of buildings and the building sector: A review

                Bookmark

                Author and article information

                Journal
                jgrb
                Journal of Green Building
                College Publishing
                1943-4618
                1552-6100
                Fall 2020
                9 December 2020
                : 15
                : 4
                : 43-66
                Author notes

                1,2,3. UCD School of Architecture, Planning and Environmental Policy, College of Engineering and Architecture, University College Dublin, Ireland

                Article
                i1943-4618-15-4-43
                10.3992/jgb.15.4.43

                Volumes 1-10 of JOGB are open access and do not require permission for use, though proper citation should be given. To view the licenses, visit https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/

                Page count
                Pages: 24
                Product
                Categories
                RESEARCH ARTICLES

                Comments

                Comment on this article