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      Mucus-penetrating nanoparticles for drug and gene delivery to mucosal tissues

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      Advanced Drug Delivery Reviews
      Elsevier BV

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          Abstract

          Mucus is a viscoelastic and adhesive gel that protects the lung airways, gastrointestinal (GI) tract, vagina, eye and other mucosal surfaces. Most foreign particulates, including conventional particle-based drug delivery systems, are efficiently trapped in human mucus layers by steric obstruction and/or adhesion. Trapped particles are typically removed from the mucosal tissue within seconds to a few hours depending on anatomical location, thereby strongly limiting the duration of sustained drug delivery locally. A number of debilitating diseases could be treated more effectively and with fewer side effects if drugs and genes could be more efficiently delivered to the underlying mucosal tissues in a controlled manner. This review first describes the tenacious mucus barrier properties that have precluded the efficient penetration of therapeutic particles. It then reviews the design and development of new mucus-penetrating particles that may avoid rapid mucus clearance mechanisms, and thereby provide targeted or sustained drug delivery for localized therapies in mucosal tissues.

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          Author and article information

          Journal
          Advanced Drug Delivery Reviews
          Advanced Drug Delivery Reviews
          Elsevier BV
          0169409X
          February 2009
          February 2009
          : 61
          : 2
          : 158-171
          Article
          10.1016/j.addr.2008.11.002
          2667119
          19133304
          238c1b9c-0627-4002-b649-2fbc3dbc5838
          © 2009

          https://www.elsevier.com/tdm/userlicense/1.0/

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