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      Alemtuzumab: a review of efficacy and risks in the treatment of relapsing remitting multiple sclerosis

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          Abstract

          Alemtuzumab is a selective humanized monoclonal antibody directed against the CD52 antigen, and has been found to be a powerful treatment for relapsing remitting multiple sclerosis. Alemtuzumab demonstrated high efficacy in several clinical studies. The risk of relapse and sustained accumulation of disability showed significant reduction in the Phase II CAMMS223 and the Phase III clinical trials CARE MS I and CARE MS II. The data presented at the 32nd Congress of the European Committee for Treatment and Research in Multiple Sclerosis confirmed these results. After completion of a 1-year treatment cycle, alemtuzumab showed a sustained effect. Although the efficacy of alemtuzumab has been widely proven, several severe adverse effects have been reported with its use. Infusion-associated reactions, increased risk of infections, and secondary autoimmunity have been associated with alemtuzumab. Autoimmune disease – mainly of the thyroid – has been reported. Immune thrombocytopenic purpura and autoimmune nephropathies have been observed less frequently. These adverse effects, given the short period of alemtuzumab marketing for relapsing remitting multiple sclerosis, require strict monitoring.

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          Most cited references 45

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          Alemtuzumab vs. interferon beta-1a in early multiple sclerosis.

           ,  Kim Norris,  J Coles (2008)
          Alemtuzumab, a humanized monoclonal antibody that targets CD52 on lymphocytes and monocytes, may be an effective treatment for early multiple sclerosis. In this phase 2, randomized, blinded trial involving previously untreated, early, relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis, we assigned 334 patients with scores of 3.0 or less on the Expanded Disability Status Scale and a disease duration of 3 years or less to receive either subcutaneous interferon beta-1a (at a dose of 44 microg) three times per week or annual intravenous cycles of alemtuzumab (at a dose of either 12 mg or 24 mg per day) for 36 months. In September 2005, alemtuzumab therapy was suspended after immune thrombocytopenic purpura developed in three patients, one of whom died. Treatment with interferon beta-1a continued throughout the study. Alemtuzumab significantly reduced the rate of sustained accumulation of disability, as compared with interferon beta-1a (9.0% vs. 26.2%; hazard ratio, 0.29; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.16 to 0.54; P<0.001) and the annualized rate of relapse (0.10 vs. 0.36; hazard ratio, 0.26; 95% CI, 0.16 to 0.41; P<0.001). The mean disability score on a 10-point scale improved by 0.39 point in the alemtuzumab group and worsened by 0.38 point in the interferon beta-1a group (P<0.001). In the alemtuzumab group, the lesion burden (as seen on T(2)-weighted magnetic resonance imaging) was reduced, as compared with that in the interferon beta-1a group (P=0.005). From month 12 to month 36, brain volume (as seen on T(1)-weighted magnetic resonance imaging) increased in the alemtuzumab group but decreased in the interferon beta-1a group (P=0.02). Adverse events in the alemtuzumab group, as compared with the interferon beta-1a group, included autoimmunity (thyroid disorders [23% vs. 3%] and immune thrombocytopenic purpura [3% vs. 1%]) and infections (66% vs. 47%). There were no significant differences in outcomes between the 12-mg dose and the 24-mg dose of alemtuzumab. In patients with early, relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis, alemtuzumab was more effective than interferon beta-1a but was associated with autoimmunity, most seriously manifesting as immune thrombocytopenic purpura. The study was not powered to identify uncommon adverse events. (ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT00050778.) 2008 Massachusetts Medical Society
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            Alemtuzumab treatment of multiple sclerosis: long-term safety and efficacy.

            Alemtuzumab is a newly licensed treatment of active relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS) in Europe, which in phase II and III studies demonstrated superior efficacy over β-interferon in reducing disability progression over 2-3 years. In this observational cohort study, we sought to describe our longer-term experience of the efficacy and safety of alemtuzumab in active RRMS.
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              Alemtuzumab more effective than interferon β-1a at 5-year follow-up of CAMMS223 clinical trial.

              To report the long-term safety and efficacy results from CAMMS223 comparing alemtuzumab with interferon β-1a in early, active relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS). What are the long-term effects of alemtuzumab treatment, received 36 to 48 months previously, on relapse and disability in early, active RRMS? This study provides evidence of the effectiveness of alemtuzumab in reducing the relapse rate and accumulation of disability compared with interferon β-1a (IFNβ-1a) through extended follow-up (up to 60 months from baseline). Of 334 patients originally randomized, 198 participated in the extension phase (151 [68%] alemtuzumab and 47 [42%] IFNβ-1a). Disability, relapses, and safety were assessed as in the original study period. Efficacy outcomes were analyzed from baseline of the original trial period to 60 months. Safety data extended beyond 60 months. Over 5 years, alemtuzumab lowered the risk of sustained accumulation of disability by 72% and the rate of relapse by 69% compared with IFNβ-1a (both p < 0.0001). The annualized relapse rate from baseline to month 60 was 0.11 for alemtuzumab and 0.35 for IFNβ-1a. Complete safety follow-up reflected 988 and 376 person-years for alemtuzumab and IFNβ-1a patients, respectively. Serious infections were seen in 7% of alemtuzumab patients and 3% of IFNβ-1a patients, and thyroid disorders were seen in 30% of alemtuzumab patients vs 4% of IFNβ-1a patients. Immune thrombocytopenia occurred in 3% of alemtuzumab patients and 0.9% of IFNβ-1a patients during the initial study period; no additional events were reported during the extension phase. One alemtuzumab patient developed Goodpasture disease 39 months after the second annual cycle of alemtuzumab. Through extended follow-up, alemtuzumab remained significantly more efficacious than IFNβ-1a, with a safety profile consistent with previous reports. This study provides Class III evidence that alemtuzumab is more effective than interferon β-1a in reducing relapses and disability in patients with RRMS in a long-term follow-up of a rater-blinded, randomized clinical trial with 59.5% of patients participating in the extended follow-up period.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Ther Clin Risk Manag
                Ther Clin Risk Manag
                Therapeutics and Clinical Risk Management
                Therapeutics and Clinical Risk Management
                Dove Medical Press
                1176-6336
                1178-203X
                2017
                14 July 2017
                : 13
                : 871-879
                Affiliations
                Experimental Neurology Laboratory, IRCCS Centro Neurolesi “Bonino-Pulejo”, Via Provinciale Palermo, Contrada Casazza, Messina, Italy
                Author notes
                Correspondence: Emanuela Mazzon, IRCCS Centro Neurolesi “Bonino-Pulejo”, Via Provinciale Palermo, Contrada Casazza, Messina 98124, Italy, Tel +39 90 6012 8708, Fax +39 90 6012 8850, Email emazzon.irccs@ 123456gmail.com
                Article
                tcrm-13-871
                10.2147/TCRM.S134398
                5522829
                © 2017 Guarnera et al. This work is published and licensed by Dove Medical Press Limited

                The full terms of this license are available at https://www.dovepress.com/terms.php and incorporate the Creative Commons Attribution – Non Commercial (unported, v3.0) License ( http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/). By accessing the work you hereby accept the Terms. Non-commercial uses of the work are permitted without any further permission from Dove Medical Press Limited, provided the work is properly attributed.

                Categories
                Review

                Medicine

                adverse events, follow-up, clinical studies, effectiveness

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