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      Internet Gaming Disorder in the DSM-5

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          Abstract

          The fifth revision of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5) includes in its research appendix a potential new diagnosis-Internet gaming disorder. This article outlines the debate surrounding non-substance addictions and the rationale for including this condition in the "Conditions for Further Study" chapter in DSM-5 Section III. It also describes the diagnostic criteria that DSM-5 recommends and methods to assess Internet gaming disorder. The paper details international research related to prevalence rates, demographic, psychiatric, and neurobiological risk factors, the natural course of the condition, and promising treatment approaches. The paper concludes by describing important issues for research to address prior to official recognition of this condition as a mental disorder.

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          Most cited references 63

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          Issues for DSM-V: internet addiction.

           Torin Block (2008)
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            An international consensus for assessing internet gaming disorder using the new DSM-5 approach.

            For the first time, the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual for Mental Disorders (DSM-5) introduces non-substance addictions as psychiatric diagnoses. The aims of this paper are to (i) present the main controversies surrounding the decision to include internet gaming disorder, but not internet addiction more globally, as a non-substance addiction in the research appendix of the DSM-5, and (ii) discuss the meaning behind the DSM-5 criteria for internet gaming disorder. The paper also proposes a common method for assessing internet gaming disorder. Although the need for common diagnostic criteria is not debated, the existence of multiple instruments reflect the divergence of opinions in the field regarding how best to diagnose this condition. We convened international experts from European, North and South American, Asian and Australasian countries to discuss and achieve consensus about assessing internet gaming disorder as defined within DSM-5. We describe the intended meaning behind each of the nine DSM-5 criteria for internet gaming disorder and present a single item that best reflects each criterion, translated into the 10 main languages of countries in which research on this condition has been conducted. Using results from this cross-cultural collaboration, we outline important research directions for understanding and assessing internet gaming disorder. As this field moves forward, it is critical that researchers and clinicians around the world begin to apply a common methodology; this report is the first to achieve an international consensus related to the assessment of internet gaming disorder. © 2014 Society for the Study of Addiction.
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              Pathological video-game use among youth ages 8 to 18: a national study.

              Researchers have studied whether some youth are "addicted" to video games, but previous studies have been based on regional convenience samples. Using a national sample, this study gathered information about video-gaming habits and parental involvement in gaming, to determine the percentage of youth who meet clinical-style criteria for pathological gaming. A Harris poll surveyed a randomly selected sample of 1,178 American youth ages 8 to 18. About 8% of video-game players in this sample exhibited pathological patterns of play. Several indicators documented convergent and divergent validity of the results: Pathological gamers spent twice as much time playing as nonpathological gamers and received poorer grades in school; pathological gaming also showed comorbidity with attention problems. Pathological status significantly predicted poorer school performance even after controlling for sex, age, and weekly amount of video-game play. These results confirm that pathological gaming can be measured reliably, that the construct demonstrates validity, and that it is not simply isomorphic with a high amount of play.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Current Psychiatry Reports
                Curr Psychiatry Rep
                Springer Science and Business Media LLC
                1523-3812
                1535-1645
                September 2015
                July 29 2015
                September 2015
                : 17
                : 9
                Article
                10.1007/s11920-015-0610-0
                26216590
                © 2015

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