7
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
0 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: found
      • Article: not found

      Prognostic Significance of Tumor-Associated Macrophage Content in Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma: A Meta-Analysis.

      Read this article at

      ScienceOpenPublisherPMC
      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Abstract

          Background: Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) exists within a microenvironment rich in immune cells. Macrophages are particularly abundant in and around tumor tissue, and have been implicated in the growth, malignancy, and persistence of HNSCC (1). However, current literature reports variable degrees of association between the density of tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) and clinicopathologic markers of disease (2, 3). These inconsistent findings may be a result of differences in approach to TAM detection. Authors have measured total TAMs in tumor tissue, while others have stained tumor samples for individual subtypes of TAMs, which include pro-inflammatory (M1-like) and immunosuppressive (M2-like). Our aim is to more clearly define the prognostic significance of the phenotypes of tumor-associated macrophages in HNSCC. Methods: We conducted a meta-analysis of the existing publications investigating the relationship between TAMs (total and M2-like subtype) and T stage, nodal involvement, vascular invasion, lymphatic invasion, and tumor differentiation (Figure 1). A total of 12 studies were included. Forest plots and risk ratios were generated to report overall effect. Results: Higher density of both total and M2-like subtype of TAMs in the tumor microenvironment is associated with advanced T stage, increased rates of nodal positivity, presence of vascular invasion, and presence of lymphatic invasion (p < 0.0001; Figures 2-9). There is no significant association between TAM density, either total or M2-like subtype, and tumor differentiation (Figures 10, 11). Conclusions: Increased density of TAMs, including those of the M2-like phenotype, correlate with poor clinicopathologic markers in HNSCC. Our findings warrant additional investigation into the subpopulations of TAMs, the mechanisms behind their recruitment and differentiation, and the associated influence of each phenotype on tumor growth and invasion. A greater understanding of TAM dynamics in HNSCC is critical for directing further research and employing TAM-targeted adjunct therapies.

          Related collections

          Author and article information

          Journal
          Front Oncol
          Frontiers in oncology
          Frontiers Media SA
          2234-943X
          2234-943X
          2019
          : 9
          Affiliations
          [1 ] Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA, United States.
          [2 ] Sidney Kimmel Medical College, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA, United States.
          [3 ] Department of Medical Oncology, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA, United States.
          [4 ] Department of Neurological Surgery, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA, United States.
          [5 ] Department of Pathology, Anatomy, and Cell Biology, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA, United States.
          [6 ] Department of Dermatology, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA, United States.
          Article
          10.3389/fonc.2019.00656
          6663973
          31396482
          243c7cc3-2d6e-4d82-bd80-a8eed910393d
          History

          M1 macrolphage,CD163,CD68,M2 macrophage,head and neck (H&N) cancer,tumor associated macrophage (TAM),tumor microenviroment

          Comments

          Comment on this article