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      Cell wall integrity signaling in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

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      Microbiology and molecular biology reviews : MMBR
      American Society for Microbiology

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          Abstract

          The yeast cell wall is a highly dynamic structure that is responsible for protecting the cell from rapid changes in external osmotic potential. The wall is also critical for cell expansion during growth and morphogenesis. This review discusses recent advances in understanding the various signal transduction pathways that allow cells to monitor the state of the cell wall and respond to environmental challenges to this structure. The cell wall integrity signaling pathway controlled by the small G-protein Rho1 is principally responsible for orchestrating changes to the cell wall periodically through the cell cycle and in response to various forms of cell wall stress. This signaling pathway acts through direct control of wall biosynthetic enzymes, transcriptional regulation of cell wall-related genes, and polarization of the actin cytoskeleton. However, additional signaling pathways interface both with the cell wall integrity signaling pathway and with the actin cytoskeleton to coordinate polarized secretion with cell wall expansion. These include Ca(2+) signaling, phosphatidylinositide signaling at the plasma membrane, sphingoid base signaling through the Pkh1 and -2 protein kinases, Tor kinase signaling, and pathways controlled by the Rho3, Rho4, and Cdc42 G-proteins.

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          Author and article information

          Journal
          Microbiol Mol Biol Rev
          Microbiology and molecular biology reviews : MMBR
          American Society for Microbiology
          1092-2172
          1092-2172
          Jun 2005
          : 69
          : 2
          Affiliations
          [1 ] Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA. levin@jhmi.edu
          Article
          69/2/262
          10.1128/MMBR.69.2.262-291.2005
          1197416
          15944456
          2471f188-a593-4e81-9c45-ac4cc29b2d07
          History

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