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      Assessing the quality of studies in meta-analyses: Advantages and limitations of the Newcastle Ottawa Scale

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      World Journal of Meta-Analysis
      Baishideng Publishing Group Inc.

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          The levels of evidence and their role in evidence-based medicine.

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            Genomic Sequencing Identifies ELF3 as a Driver of Ampullary Carcinoma.

            Ampullary carcinomas are highly malignant neoplasms that can have either intestinal or pancreatobiliary differentiation. To characterize somatic alterations in ampullary carcinomas, we performed whole-exome sequencing and DNA copy-number analysis on 60 ampullary carcinomas resected from clinically well-characterized Japanese and American patients. We next selected 92 genes and performed targeted sequencing to validate significantly mutated genes in an additional 112 cancers. The prevalence of driver gene mutations in carcinomas with the intestinal phenotype is different from those with the pancreatobiliary phenotype. We identified a characteristic significantly mutated driver gene (ELF3) as well as previously known driver genes (TP53, KRAS, APC, and others). Functional studies demonstrated that ELF3 silencing in normal human epithelial cells enhances their motility and invasion.
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              Inverse relationship between body mass index and mortality in older nursing home residents: a meta-analysis of 19,538 elderly subjects.

              Body mass index (BMI) and mortality in old adults from the general population have been related in a U-shaped or J-shaped curve. However, limited information is available for elderly nursing home populations, particularly about specific cause of death. A systematic PubMed/EMBASE/CINAHL/SCOPUS search until 31 May 2014 without language restrictions was conducted. As no published study reported mortality in standard BMI groups (<18.5, 18.5-24.9, 25-29.9, ≥30 kg/m(2)), the most adjusted hazard ratios (HRs) according to a pre-defined list of covariates were obtained from authors and pooled by random-effect model across each BMI category. Out of 342 hits, 20 studies including 19,538 older nursing home residents with 5,223 deaths during a median of 2 years of follow-up were meta-analysed. Compared with normal weight, all-cause mortality HRs were 1.41 (95% CI = 1.26-1.58) for underweight, 0.85 (95% CI = 0.73-0.99) for overweight and 0.74 (95% CI = 0.57-0.96) for obesity. Underweight was a risk factor for higher mortality caused by infections (HR = 1.65 [95% CI = 1.13-2.40]). RR results corroborated primary HR results, with additionally lower infection-related mortality in overweight and obese than in normal-weight individuals. Like in the general population, underweight is a risk factor for mortality in old nursing home residents. However, uniquely, not only overweight but also obesity is protective, which has relevant nutritional goal implications in this population/setting.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                applab
                World Journal of Meta-Analysis
                WJMA
                Baishideng Publishing Group Inc.
                2308-3840
                2017
                2017
                : 5
                : 4
                : 80
                Article
                10.13105/wjma.v5.i4.80
                247378da-4c8b-4444-8527-b3a575fdeced
                © 2017
                History

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